While heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) are just 5% of vehicle sales in China, they consume nearly 50% of all on-road transport fuel.

To meet upcoming mandatory fleet-average reductions in CO2, heavy-duty vehicle manufacturers will have to introduce fuel-efficient technologies at a faster rate than they have done in past decades.

There is considerable interest in India in moving toward fuel-efficiency standards based on simulation modeling, and particularly in exploring the feasibility of using the Vehicle Energy Consumption Calculation Tool (VECTO) developed by the European Commission.

This paper summarizes and compares the two main test methods for aerodynamic evaluations of heavy trucks in the United States and the European Union: coastdown testing and constant-speed testing, respectively.

China is considering options for increasing fuel efficiency and reduce CO2 emissions from freight transportation. This study assesses the future costs of existing and emerging technologies to reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions of long‑haul tractor‑trailers in China.

This analysis examines the potential of fuel-saving technologies for new heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) in India less than 12 tonnes over the next 10 years. This is a follow-up study to research that completed for the greater than 12-tonne segment.

Heavy-duty vehicles in the European Union so far have not been subject to carbon dioxide emissions or fuel-consumption standards, making Europe the largest market without mandatory limits for such vehicles.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recently published the final Phase 2 rules targeting fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions attributable to new heavy-duty vehicles and engines.

In the European Union, CO2 emissions from commercial vehicles grew much faster than from passenger vehicles from 1990 to 2014. Trucks and buses now produce about a quarter of CO2 emissions from road transport in the EU, and that share is growing as emissions from cars and vans decline further to meet increasingly tight CO2 standards.

Heavy-duty vehicles produce about a quarter of all carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from road transport in the European Union (EU), and some 5% of the EU’s total greenhouse gas emissions. Their share is growing, as emissions from cars and vans decline in response to increasingly stringent CO2 standards for those vehicles.

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