This analysis examines the potential of fuel-saving technologies for new heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) in India less than 12 tonnes over the next 10 years. This is a follow-up study to research that completed for the greater than 12-tonne segment.

Heavy-duty vehicles in the European Union so far have not been subject to carbon dioxide emissions or fuel-consumption standards, making Europe the largest market without mandatory limits for such vehicles.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recently published the final Phase 2 rules targeting fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions attributable to new heavy-duty vehicles and engines.

In the European Union, CO2 emissions from commercial vehicles grew much faster than from passenger vehicles from 1990 to 2014. Trucks and buses now produce about a quarter of CO2 emissions from road transport in the EU, and that share is growing as emissions from cars and vans decline further to meet increasingly tight CO2 standards.

Heavy-duty vehicles produce about a quarter of all carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from road transport in the European Union (EU), and some 5% of the EU’s total greenhouse gas emissions. Their share is growing, as emissions from cars and vans decline in response to increasingly stringent CO2 standards for those vehicles.

The goal of this new stage of standard is to reduce fuel consumption by about 15% in 2020 from the 2015 levels, in order to further reduce the gap between China and other more developed markets globally .In April 2016, the third stage of China’s heavy-duty vehicle fuel consumption standard was released for public comment.

The goal of this new stage of standard is to reduce fuel consumption by about 15% in 2020 from the 2015 levels, in order to further reduce the gap between China and other more developed markets globally .In April 2016, the third stage of China’s heavy-duty vehicle fuel consumption standard was released for public comment.

The primary objective of this literature review is to provide a glimpse at technology changes for diesel and natural gas (NG) engines in the HDV space that are expected over the next 10 to 15 years as India transitions to world-class criteria pollutant emissions standards and improved efficiency becomes a larger focus as a result of fuel efficie

India is in the process of developing fuel efficiency standards for new heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs), and one of the most critical inputs to regulatory development is a technology potential analysis to determine the efficiency levels that the fleet can reasonably achieve over the duration of the regulation.

Analyzes the implications of a growing natural gas vehicle fleet on the emission benefits of the U.S. HDV “Phase 2” greenhouse gas rulemaking, synthesizing data on upstream emissions, vehicle emissions, and efficiency technology.

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