Some 385,000 people worldwide died prematurely in 2015 from air pollution caused by vehicle exhaust emissions finds this study published by International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT) which singled out diesel engines as the main culprit. China, the EU, the United States, and India accounted for 70% of global transportation-attributable PM2.5 and ozone deaths but just under half of the global population.

Urban transit bus fleets are a significant source of air pollutant emissions, including black carbon, a harmful ultrafine particle and potent short-lived climate pollutant. Transit bus fleets are therefore an important target for accelerated transitions to clean engine technologies and fuels.

This briefing paper looks closely at the Euro 6/VI vehicle emissions standards, which tighten the limits on air pollutant emissions established in prior European standards, and require the best available technology for vehicle emissions control.

Poor air quality across Indian cities threatens the health of millions, and pollution levels have remained at dangerous levels throughout the last decade. To address the urban air quality crisis, officials have targeted motor vehicles, a major source of pollution in urban areas.

Black carbon is the second largest contributor to human-induced climate warming, after carbon dioxide. International shipping is a major source of diesel black carbon emissions and not yet subject to international regulation.

Presentation by Ray Minjares, Clean Air Program Lead at Anil Agarwal Dialogue 2015: Poor in climate change, India Habitat Centre, New Delhi, March 11 – 12, 2015.

Accelerated adoption of clean vehicle and fuel policies would save 25 million years of life cumulatively by 2030 and reduce early deaths by more than 210,000 lives in 2030 and the greatest single health gains would occur in China and India by preventing 90,000 early deaths, about 40 percent of the global total. Read more in this new report by ICCT.