The world is off-track to meet most of the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) targets linked to hunger, food security and nutrition, according to a FAO report. The report paints a grim picture.

Climate crisis disasters are happening at the rate of one a week, though most draw little international attention and work is urgently needed to prepare developing countries for the profound impact

The United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development promises to achieve change in almost every aspect of life on Earth. Encompassing 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and 169 targets, the Agenda marks the first time in history when all nations have agreed on how to chart their future.

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) – in which a microorganism (such as a bacterium, virus, fungus or parasite) becomes resistant to an antimicrobial drug used to treat infections caused by it – is possibly the most serious public health threat of our time.

Effective policies and investments are urgently needed if the world's poorest countries are to offer a future to hundreds of millions of marginalized young people living in rural areas, according to a new report by the United Nations' International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD).

Many developing countries are vulnerable to natural disasters that can have large human and economic costs: disaster risk management for these countries is a macro-critical challenge.

The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) launched the United Nations' Decade of Family Farming and a Global Action Plan to boost support for family farmers, particularly those in developing countries.

In developing countries, the agriculture sector absorbs 26 percent of the total economic damage and loss caused by climate-induced disasters, according to one recent FAO study .

Tens of millions of pounds are to be spent on developing “super crops” to improve diets in poor countries in the face of climate change, the government has said.

This report aims to enhance understanding of the implications, capacity needs and enabling conditions for trade liberalization of environmentally sound technologies (ESTs), with focus on developing countries.

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