Vulnerable developing countries lead world on climate ambition: UN report. Developing countries are leading the world in responding to climate change, according to a new report which calls for bold, urgent action to limit the impacts of global warming.

A new paradigm for power sector reform emerged during the 1990s, under the influence of the Washington Consensus, and began to spread across the developing world.

The rapid spread of digital technologies is transforming many economic and social activities. While creating many new opportunities, widening digital divides threaten to leave developing countries, and especially least developed countries, further behind.

Climate-related disasters are increasing in frequency and severity and both economic and human losses are climbing. Unfortunately, developing countries, which are the least equipped to deal with disasters, are often impacted the most. Over the past two decades, new financial tools have emerged to help developing countries cope with disaster.

Taking a food systems approach is a promising strategy for improving diets. Implementing such an approach would require the use of a comprehensive set of metrics to characterize food systems, set meaningful goals, track food systems performance, and evaluate the impacts of food systems interventions.

The least developed countries (LDCs), landlocked developing countries (LLDCs) and small island developing states (SIDS) are among the most vulnerable groups of countries in the world. They are disproportionately affected by the negative impacts of climate change due to their structural constraints and geographical disadvantage.

The world is off-track to meet most of the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) targets linked to hunger, food security and nutrition, according to a FAO report. The report paints a grim picture.

Climate crisis disasters are happening at the rate of one a week, though most draw little international attention and work is urgently needed to prepare developing countries for the profound impact

This paper finds evidence that the displacement of population by flooding is associated with a higher risk of social disorder in large cities in developing countries. Floods regularly displace large numbers of people in developing countries, leading to increased population movement from rural areas to the largest cities.

The United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development promises to achieve change in almost every aspect of life on Earth. Encompassing 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and 169 targets, the Agenda marks the first time in history when all nations have agreed on how to chart their future.

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