About half of the world’s oil and gas is produced by “middle-income” developing countries. These countries could face a significant drop in government revenue due to the global shift away from fossil fuels.

This is a challenge for food security globally, but particularly for net food-importing developing countries. And unlike in previous food crises, they now face a double burden. They not only pay higher prices for the food they import, but the price increase is exacerbated by the depreciation of their currency vis-à-vis the US dollar.

This paper uses a global data set from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development to assess the scale of funding for nature-based solutions to climate change aimed at developing countries. It also examines how effectively this funding is being put to use.

Plastics leakage to the ocean and, more broadly, the environment has become a pressing issue for many developing countries.

The consequences of climate change in developing countries are worsening fast: many ecosystems will shortly reach points of irreversible damage, and socio-economic costs will continue to rise. To alleviate the future impacts on populations and economies, policy makers are looking for the spaces where they can make the greatest difference.

Humanity is at a crossroads - a moment of great risk and great opportunity. One path leads to attractive growth and development; the other to great difficulties and destruction.

Achieving global goals for access to energy and mitigation of climate change will require a quadrupling of present levels of solar photovoltaic, nine times current wind power generation and a doubling of the geothermal power generation in the developing world by 2025.

This report analyses the intersection of HIV, COVID-19 and public debt in developing countries. The collision between COVID-19 and a crippling debt crisis have reversed decades of progress - putting present and future investments in health and HIV at risk. Pragmatic options to address the pandemic triad are proposed.

This report was produced jointly by IRENA and the United Nations Office of the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States (UN-OHRLLS).

As developing countries increasingly transition from planning to implementation of their National Adaptation Plan (NAP) processes and nationally determined contributions (NDCs), a growing number have prepared or plan to prepare financing strategies for adaptation.

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