This book brings together the insights and expertise of a dozen expert modellers and policy analysts, who completed this project on modelling for sustainable development in June 2019 using the "Book Sprints" method.

This working paper models the impact of the removal of fossil fuel subsidies on greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions for the following countries: Algeria, Bangladesh, Brazil, China, Egypt, Germany, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Mexico, Morocco, Myanmar, Nigeria, Pakistan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Tunisia, United

This report presents the case for a "subsidy swap"—reallocating some of the savings from fossil fuel subsidy reform to fund the clean energy transition. Fossil fuel to clean energy subsidy swaps are already taking place.

Switching subsides from kerosene to off-grid solar would benefit the millions of Indian households that suffer frequent blackouts or that cannot afford grid electricity. A range of off-grid solar products is now cheaper than kerosene over the lifespan of the technology.

This issue brief takes a detailed look at why such a large share of coal power is struggling today and the drivers—including subsidies—that may cause similar crises to rear their heads in future.

The Goods and Services Tax (GST) has increased the cost of solar photovoltaic (PV) power generation by almost 6 per cent and reduced the cost of coal thermal power generation by 1.6 per cent. The absolute size of the subsidy to coal power generation remains INR 7,685 crore (USD 1.1 billion) higher than for solar PV in 2018.

Enrvironmental and social impact assessments (ESIAs), environmental and social management plans (ESMP), closure and rehabilitation plans, and potential resettlement action plans (RAPs) are essential tools for any process related to the granting of environmental permits or mining authorizations.

This publication makes a first attempt at an integrated analysis of how Indonesia both taxes and subsidizes production and consumption of oil, gas, coal and electricity (most of which is generated with coal). The paper also explores lessons learned from Indonesia’s reduction of fiscal dependence on fossil fuels.

The report presents the interim results of the SAVi simulation and analysis. By considering Lake Dal and the surrounding area as an interconnected economic, environmental and social "system," impacts of competing users and associated sources of pollution on the lake's water quality were assessed.

Most of the people suffering from hunger around the world live in rural areas and engage in agricultural activity. It is not just a coincidence that they also often lack basic services, such as energy and irrigation provision, due to a lack of infrastructure. This lack of infrastructure is an important reason for their vulnerability to hunger.

Pages