Fossil fuel combustion is a major source of toxic air pollution that kills 7 million people every year, almost the same number of deaths caused by tobacco smoking. Burning fossil fuels releases a series of gases and tiny particles that have noxious effects for human health, leading to several respiratory and cardiovascular diseases and cancer.

This paper seeks to assist policy-makers and researchers in India who are working to promote the uptake of off-grid, solar-powered pumps for groundwater irrigation. It begins by setting out key WEF linkages of importance for off-grid solar pumps.

In 2015, the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change legislated new standards to limit the concentration of sulphur oxides (SOx), nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM) and mercury (Hg) in stack emissions for coal-fired power plants.

Despite the challenging policy environment, there are also opportunities for real progress in several areas between now and 2025. This report addresses seven concrete ways in which the Indonesian government can overcome the existing obstacles and make significant progress to grow renewable energy before 2025.

As the three most populous countries in Asia, China, India and Indonesia share a lot in common when it comes to projected significant economic growth, and along with it, an increase in the power capacity driven by booming demand.

A fuel price cut by India’s central government from October 2018 to June 2019 resulted in subsidies of INR 26,957 crore (USD 3.9 billion) for gasoline and diesel. This far overshadowed funding for the government’s flagship electric vehicles (EV) subsidy program of INR 10,000 crore (USD 1.4 billion) over three years.

This book brings together the insights and expertise of a dozen expert modellers and policy analysts, who completed this project on modelling for sustainable development in June 2019 using the "Book Sprints" method.

This working paper models the impact of the removal of fossil fuel subsidies on greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions for the following countries: Algeria, Bangladesh, Brazil, China, Egypt, Germany, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Mexico, Morocco, Myanmar, Nigeria, Pakistan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Tunisia, United

This report presents the case for a "subsidy swap"—reallocating some of the savings from fossil fuel subsidy reform to fund the clean energy transition. Fossil fuel to clean energy subsidy swaps are already taking place.

Switching subsides from kerosene to off-grid solar would benefit the millions of Indian households that suffer frequent blackouts or that cannot afford grid electricity. A range of off-grid solar products is now cheaper than kerosene over the lifespan of the technology.

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