Poor dietary quality is a significant risk factor for stunting and micronutrient deficiencies among young children and globally one of the leading causes of premature death and disease (Arimond & Ruel, 2004; Forouzanfar et al., 2015). Dietary quality is typically proxied by diversity of the consumed diet.

This document focuses on the intensity and frequency of natural hazards and conflicts is increasing, and they are leaving in their wake an unprecedented level of humanitarian needs. Natural hazards alone occur nearly five times as often today as 40 years ago.

How severe, how many and when: In July 2019, estimated 2.6 Million people (19% of the population in ASAL) are classified in IPC phase 3 and/or worse acute food insecurity. Comparing to 2018 same period, around 700,000 people were classified in Crisis (IPC Phase 3).

The main objective of the MVAC assessment is to answer key questions on the status of food and nutrition security in a given consumption year. Key questions about who is affected; why are they affected; where are the affected; how much food and non food needs and for how long.

The purpose of this summary report is to present a synopsis of the findings derived from the 2018/19 Drought and Household Food Security Assessment.

An alarmingly high number of children are suffering the consequences of poor diets and a food system that is failing them, UNICEF warned in a new report on children, food and nutrition.

According to the State of Food and Agriculture 2019 released by FAO , globally around 14 percent of the world's food is lost after harvesting and before reaching the retail level, including through on-farm activities, storage and transportation.

The "triple burden" of malnutrition is a public health challenge throughout sub-Saharan Africa, where high levels of undernutrition and micronutrient deficiencies in rural areas occur alongside increased overnutrition and obesity in cities.

Considering the detrimental environmental impact of current food systems, and the concerns raised about their sustainability, there is an urgent need to promote diets that are healthy and have low environmental impacts. These diets also need to be socio-culturally acceptable and economically accessible for all.

Agricultural development has historically focused on poverty reduction and food security but is now increasingly asked to help improve nutrition. Despite this strengthened nutritional mandate, agricultural policies and programs have struggled to develop effective, scalable and cost-effective approaches for reducing undernutrition.

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