The Horn of Africa is facing the third severe La Niña‑induced drought episode in a decade, and the region is on the verge of a catastrophe if humanitarian assistance is not urgently scaled up.

Hunger in the Arab region continues to rise, with a 91.1 percent increase since 2000, says a new report by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

This most recent report on the state of food security and nutrition in Asia and the Pacific tells a grim story. An estimated 375.8 million people in the region faced hunger in 2020, which is nearly 54 million more people than in 2019.

A new report shows that the number of hungry people in Africa continues to rise, spurred by conflict, climate change and economic slowdowns including those triggered by COVID-19.

Humankind is facing a perfect storm of climate change, biodiversity loss, and multiple forms of malnutrition.

This report examines the relationship between water governance and food insecurity in Small Island Developing States (SIDS). It starts by profiling the socio-economic and biophysical diversity in the SIDS, traces water flows on the islands in terms of volume and quality and identifies the factors that exert pressure on water resources.

In 2019 and 2020 alone, sub-Saharan Africa was hit by a once-in-a-century desert locust upsurge and the COVID-19 pandemic while simultaneously facing conflict, droughts, and floods among other shocks and stressors. More than 60 percent of the population in sub-Saharan Africa depends on agriculture for food and income.

The state of food security and nutrition in the world, including that of the Europe and Central Asia region, was marked in 2020 by the outbreak of COVID-19 and resulting disruptions to markets, trade and food supply chains. The pandemic has had a negative effect on food security in the region.

In recent years, various factors have diverted the world off the path to eradicating hunger, food insecurity and all forms of malnutrition by 2030, and the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated this trend. Latin America and the Caribbean is no exception.

The COVID-19 situation in the country continued to improve leading to the government relaxing most restrictive measures in early September, which enabled households to resume livelihood activities. Although vaccination rates have reduced, they still remain among the highest in Africa.

Pages