Agrifood systems cannot be transformed unless there is gender equality. That was the simple message underlying the launch of a new report by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the African Union that puts the spotlight on women's role in agrifood systems.

There is an urgent need to assess the linkages between diet patterns and environmental sustainability in order to meet global targets for reducing premature mortality and improving sustainable management of natural resources.

At the heart of the 2030 Agenda was a promise to prioritize two objectives: to eradicate poverty and end hunger and malnutrition in all their forms. While global hunger, measured by the prevalence of undernourishment, had been on the decline, the absolute number of hungry people remained very high.

Over the past decade, the Gambia has registered some progress in improving the nutritional status of children, particularly the reduction of the prevalence of stunting, wasting and underweight among children under five years of age.

The Cost of Hunger in Africa (COHA) is an African Union Commission (AUC) led initiative through which countries are able to estimate the social and economic impact of child undernutrition in a given year. About 16 countries are initially participating in the study. Sudan is part of the phase VI countries.

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development pledged to move away from growing inequality to more inclusive, shared growth, away from ecocide, mass extinction of our plant and animal biodiversity, and waste and destruction of our planet’s abundant but still finite natural resources to practices that respect and protect our common home, and away f

There was a modest decline in underweight prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa. Anaemia declined fastest among adult women and the richest pregnant women, although it affects all women with no marked disparities. Overweight is increasing rapidly among adult women and women with no education.

The past two decades have demonstrated the manifold pathways through which comprehensive and integrated social protection systems can enable and ensure food security and nutrition in Southern Africa.

Cooking school meals requires energy. In some countries, families are asked to contribute to fuel expenses or to provide firewood, failing which, children may be refused school meals. The acquisition of fuel, whether it is purchased or collected, is a considerable burden for schools that risks hindering the scale and scope of WFP’s programmes.

The aim of this study is to identify how Africa may transform its potentials into realities and actually secure its supply of food for affordable and healthy diets from the sustainable use of resources. Africa’s food imports amount to about US$ 60 billion per year.

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