This brief examines estimates produced by several recent model simulations and frameworks that focus on the cost of ending hunger as well as progress toward other development goals—estimates that range from US$7 billion to US$265 billion per year.

The promotion of cooperatives is widely viewed as the most important institutional arrangement for spurring dairy development in India and much of the success of the White Revolution in India is attributed to the cooperative framework of the country's dairy development strategies.

WAAPP supports the generation, dissemination, and adoption of improved technologies; the creation of enabling conditions for regional cooperation; and the development of human and institutional capacity across the subregion; along with the creation of youth employment, the participation of women, and adaption to climate change.

Examine temporal and spatial trends in public and private expenditure on agriculture in India, and its welfare effects in terms of agricultural growth and mitigation of rural poverty.

Despite progresses over the last few decades, undernutrition is widespread across Africa south of the Sahara. While agricultural interventions have traditionally focused on enhancing yields of few staple crops, there is increased interest on the role of production diversity in enhancing the dietary quality of subsistence farm households.

Reducing undernutrition requires improving access to goods and services from a wide range of economic and social sectors, including agriculture, education and health.

India, a country with high concentrations of poor and malnourished people, long promoted a cereal-centric diet composed of subsidized staple commodities such as rice and wheat to feed its population of more than a billion. Today, however, dietary patterns are changing.

Sub-Saharan African exports of horticultural and processed agricultural products are growing in line with the major shift toward these products in world markets. Continued growth in such exports may be vitally important for expanding returns from African agriculture and for increasing Africa’s overall exports.

The demand for compliance with food safety measures (FSM) at farm level, an integral component of food security, is increasing. Yet, literature on the assessment of FSM at the farm level is scarce, especially for developing countries.

This paper provides a helpful framing to understand both why and how policy attention and investments should be channeled through agriculture and agrifood systems as key vehicles for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

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