The CAT Climate Governance series seeks to produce a practical framework for assessing a government’s readiness – both from an institutional and governance point of view – to ratchet up climate policy and implement adequate transformational policies on the ground, to enable the required economy-wide transformation towards a zero emissions societ

This paper reviews the current state of policies and frameworks on climate change, agriculture, food, and nutrition security in Kenya.

The climate-smart agriculture (CSA) Data Atlas and Training Guidebook can help operationalize Kenya’s Climate-Smart Agriculture Strategy (KCSAS) and its framework at the county level by building capacity of local CSA stakeholders and designing the county CSA plans.

This paper presents potential of low-emission dairy production, investment options, and financial mechanisms in Kenya’s dairy sub-sector to better support its necessary transition and enhance contribution to national greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction goals.

Development corridors are focal points for national and international development investment in East Africa, and national governments are directing their limited public sector resources towards corridor development.

There is vast literature on groups as a useful mechanism for rural development, especially for women. However, for group participation to fulfil on potential benefits to women, gender-specific constraints must be addressed.

Producers trading in informal agricultural markets in low- and middle-income countries make daily choices concerning their livelihood and marketing strategies. Different contexts present varying degrees of market power and knowledge asymmetries across value chains and trading relations.

The right to safe food is enshrined in the Kenyan constitution.

Low-emission development (LED) is becoming an increasingly important reference point for guiding and evaluating agricultural interventions. In the dairy sector, LED effectively is pursued through standard intensification practices, which reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emission intensities.

Kenya’s economy has been hit hard by COVID-19, severely affecting incomes and jobs. The economy has been exposed through the dampening effects on domestic activity of the containment measures and behavioral responses, and through trade and travel disruption (affecting key foreign currency earners such as tourism and cut flowers).

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