In the quest to reduce global under- and malnutrition, which is particularly high among smallholder farmers, agriculture-nutrition linkages have received a lot of attention in recent years.

High population growth rates in Ethiopia are likely to aggravate farmland scarcity, as the agrarian share of the population stays persistently high, but also create increasing demand for food and non-food biomass.

Public works programs (PWPs) in sub-Saharan African countries have re-emerged as an important policy to stimulate employment generation in addition to their protective role such as consumption smoothening.

This policy brief summarizes insights from research conducted in India which investigated the factors that drive the adoption of modern energy in the country. Access to energy remains a critical issue around the globe. At least 1.3 billion people worldwide do not have adequate access to electricity.

In this paper, seek to answer three research questions: (1) What is the pattern of foreign direct investment (FDI) in the African food and agriculture sector in the last 15 years? (2) What are the drivers of FDI in the African food and agriculture sector?

This paper examines the state, drivers and, consequently, the impacts of agricultural mechanization in eleven countries in Africa.

With increasing Internet user rates across Africa, there is considerable interest in exploring new, online data sources. Particularly, search engine metadata, i.e.

The Agriculture sector in Ethiopia is still practiced in a traditional way and has become incapable to provide food and nutrition security for the majority of the population. As a result, malnutrition has remained to be one of the leading health challenges in Ethiopia being responsible for 53% of infant and child deaths.

Community-based health insurance (CBHI) schemes have emerged as strong pathways to universal health coverage in developing countries. Their examination has largely focussed on their impacts on financial protection and on the utilisation of curative health services.

While community-based health insurance (CBHI) becomes increasingly integrated into health systems in developing countries, there is still limited research and evidence on its probable health impacts beyond its functions for health financing or for facilitating access to services.

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