With India staring at a looming water crisis, a new study on ‘water productivity mapping of major crops’ has called for putting a price on water used for irrigation to at least recover operating and maintenance costs of structures like canals.

This study examines the performance of the public agricultural extension system in three high growth states as well as three comparatively moderate performing states.

Indian agriculture is estimated to be consuming about 78 percent of total fresh water resources available in the country. Yet, more than half of the gross cropped area is still dependent on rains.

With increasing farm distress in the wake of falling farm prices in 2017, the State Government of Madhya Pradesh (GoMP) came out with an innovative scheme called Bhavantar Bhugtan Yojana (BBY), a price deficiency payment (PDP) scheme, to support farmers.

Farmers in India are exposed to large agriculture risks due to vagaries of nature. One of the most effective mechanisms to mitigate agricultural risks is to have a robust insurance system.

The paper presents a case for a phased rolling out of direct benefits transfer (DBT) for Food in India.

The current study is about estimating the extent to which domestic prices of major Indian agriculture commodities deviate from their corresponding free trade reference prices.

The present study involves an extensive stocktaking exercise of the types of innovations that have emerged globally and in India in particular, and their increasing impact on the agricultural sector. The stocktaking exercise is based not only on peer-reviewed research from the academic fields, but also draws on recent corporate studies.

Odisha is one of the poorest states in the country, with around 36 per cent of the rural population living below the poverty line. Ninety one per cent of poverty in Odisha is rural and more than 60 per cent of its workforce is engaged in agriculture.

In India, Prime Minister Modi has set an ambitious target of installing 100 GW (100,000 MW) of solar power capacity by 2022. The current solar capacity in India stands at 8 GW as on July end, 2016. Thus, the target of moving from 8 GW in July 2016 to 100 GW by 2022, is one of the most ambitious targets globally.

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