Crop yields are projected to decrease under future climate conditions, and recent research suggests that yields have already been impacted. However, current impacts on a diversity of crops subnationally and implications for food security remains unclear. Here, we constructed linear regression relationships using weather and reported crop data to assess the potential impact of observed climate change on the yields of the top ten global crops–barley, cassava, maize, oil palm, rapeseed, rice, sorghum, soybean, sugarcane and wheat at ~20,000 political units.

Last year, the maximum cases of stubble burning recorded in a single day was 1,500 on May 9, 2018, across the state. This year, the maximum number of cases were recorded on May 12 at 1,291.

Climate extremes, such as droughts or heat waves, can lead to harvest failures and threaten the livelihoods of agricultural producers and the food security of communities worldwide. Improving our understanding of their impacts on crop yields is crucial to enhance the resilience of the global food system.

Sources in the agriculture department are expecting a 1-2% loss of yield in affected areas as well as a delay in the harvesting of wheat crop in the state.

Farmers in the North West Himalayan region generally practise rainfed agriculture and have very limited scope for irrigation. Water scarcity is a major constraint for crop production in these areas. This problem exacerbates further during the Rabi season where vagaries of winter rain result in complete crop failure.

An international consortium has sequenced the entire genome of durum wheat -- the source of semolina for pasta, a food staple for the world's population, according to an article published today in

Wild oats are a kind of grass weed and one of the greatest enemies of certain grains such as barley, rye and wheat.

Study by IIT-Delhi reveals drastic reduction in lenght of pleasant, comfortable days

The selection of seed varieties adapted to a particular climate could be refined if farmers themselves assess their performance, using their plots as small, experimental laboratories.

As the world population swells, the inequitable distribution of food around the globe is prompting profound moral questions.

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