ABIDJAN (Reuters) - Hot, dry weather last week in most of top grower Ivory Coast’s cocoa regions has raised fears about bean quality and production for the remainder of the main crop, farmers said

Chocolate could reportedly vanish as early as 2050.

The World Bank, together with the World Cocoa Foundation and Climate Focus, has released a new report to help guide the work of these governments and companies to operationalize the Frameworks for Action at the level of cocoa farmers.

Global cocoa production faces mounting environmental and economic challenges. Despite long-term global demand, cocoa producers are confronting the triple challenge of increasing productivity on limited land, reducing pressure on forests and ecosystems, and increasing their resilience to climate change.

Without a renewed commitment to policy change, commodity-dependent developing countries (CDDCs) are by 2030 set to lag behind countries with more diverse economies in their social and economic achievements, UNCTAD and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) said in a report.

At COP23, the UN climate talks in Bonn, Germany that wrapped up last week, top cocoa-producing countries in West Africa announced new commitments to end the massive deforestation for cocoa that

Harvesting for the October-to-March main crop officially started on Oct.1, but heavy rainfall in parts of the primary cocoa-growing regions has caused the spread of disease.

An ethnic-fuelled land dispute has driven thousands of farmers off illegal plantations in Ivory Coast's main cocoa belt, threatening the start of the harvest in the world's top producer.

The world’s chocolate industry is driving deforestation on a devastating scale in West Africa, the Guardian can reveal.

The two countries have agreed to exchange ideas as well as resources in agro processing

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