It has been estimated that rice production accounts for up to 55% of the total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions budget from agricultural soils.

Managing climate risk in agriculture requires a proper understanding of climatic conditions, regional and global climatic drivers, as well as major agricultural activities at the particular location of interest.

Moving towards net zero GHG emissions by 2050 is likely a pre-condition for avoiding global warming higher than 1.5o C by the end of the century. The land-use and agriculture sector can provide close to one third of this global commitment while ensuring food security, farmer resilience, and sustainable development.

Agricultural GHG emissions are predominately in the form of CH4, nitrous oxide (N2O), CO2, and black carbon. Methane and black carbon are both SLCPs. Black carbon emissions can be caused by the burning of biomass (such as crop residues) and from incomplete combustion of fossil fuels.

Science–policy interactions are exchanges among key stakeholders looking to reconcile value systems and interests to ultimately, influence decision-making processes through knowledge exchange and generation.

Approximately 30% of the whole SADC region is exposed to a variety of climate hazards and their combinations. High growing season temperatures are the most prevalent (10% of area).

The COVID-19 pandemic and the subsequent enforcement of mobility restrictions have created bottlenecks in the agri-food system. When the food supply chain is disrupted, economic loss occurs, putting rural households, already in poverty, into severe food insecurity.

This document presents some of the main routes by which R4D can contribute to agricultural transformation in the Sahel towards inclusive and sustainable economic growth, social development and resilience, including climate smart agricultural technologies appropriate to smallholder farming families.

This brief summarizes findings of a project entitled “Food Security in Developing Countries: Gender and Spatial Interactions’” undertaken by researchers from the University of Alberta.

Agroecology is increasingly seen as being able, or even necessary, to transform food systems (HLPE 2019).

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