Rain-fed agriculture currently constitutes 60–95% of farmed land across the developing world. Changing rainfall patterns could have a large impact on agriculture in developing countries. Using over 20 different climate models, researchers have projected how precipitation could be affected by climate change.

One of the greatest challenges humanity faces is feeding the world’s human population in a sustainable, nutritious, equitable and ethical way under a changing climate. Urgent transformations are needed that allow farmers to adapt and develop while also being climate resilient and contributing minimal emissions.

Rice production is integral to agriculture and food security in Vietnam, but it also contributes greenhouse gas emissions. In 2010, paddy rice production emitted 44.61 million tons carbon dioxide equivalents (MtCO2e), 18% of total national GHG emissions.

Climate-smart aquaculture (CSAq) is considered an appropriate and effective adaptation approach for the coastal aquaculture sector under the climate change phenomenon. This study, applying probit model, aims to assess the influence of several factors on the farmers’ decision to apply CSAq practices in extensive coastal shrimp farming.

Current initiatives to store carbon in soils as a measure to mitigate climate change are gaining momentum. Agriculture plays an important role in soil carbon initiatives, as almost 40% of the world’s soils are currently used as cropland and grassland.

Livestock in Kenya, Ethiopia, and Uganda play an important role in food security, livelihoods, income, and gross domestic product (GDP).

Science–policy interfaces are critical in shaping agricultural and environmental governance. However, connecting science with policy has always been a challenge for both scientists and policymakers.

The carbon footprint of food loss and waste (FLW) is estimated to be up to 3.49 gigatons of carbon dioxide equivalent (gtCO2e), representing up to 6–10% of total anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (HLPE 2014). Addressing FLW can reduce the emission intensity of the agricultural system; i.e.

This report documents the activities carried out under the CIP-CCAFS study on identifying opportunities and challenges for creating a climate-smart food system in the Philippines and Vietnam.

The Stepwise Climate Smart Investment Pathway (Stepwise) is an approach developed by the IITA research team in collaboration with partners. Stepwise breaks down the recommended best practices that many farmers cannot afford to implement into smaller, more affordable packages that can be implemented in phases.

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