To achieve food security and agricultural development goals, adaptation to climate change and lower emission intensities per output will be necessary. This transformation must be accomplished without depletion of the natural resource base.

With the rapid increase in the dynamics caused by climate change, policies governing climate change have proliferated while the integration of gender considerations to address the gender-differentiated needs and impacts has remained a challenge.

Globally, women and men tend to have different climate change vulnerabilities and benefit differently from climate change adaptation and mitigation efforts. This is due to a range of factors including access to resources and knowledge, time restraints, and inclusion in decision-making processes.

To achieve food security and agricultural development goals, adaptation to climate change and lower emission intensities per output will be necessary. This transformation must be accomplished without depletion of the natural resource base.

Climate change is described as the defining challenge of our generation. It poses direct and indirect threats to food security, human security and global health. This study explores the impact of climate change on the rights to food, security and health within the context of sub-Saharan Africa by analysing data for correlation.

Agriculture is a major source of livelihood and income in The Gambia. Despite its socio-economic importance, the sector faces many institutional, technological, and biophysical challenges limiting its contribution to economic development.

Climate change adaptation is dependent on access to a number of resources, including information, land, financing, and mobility.

The working paper presents a framework for assessing country-specific needs, opportunities and priorities for improving measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) of livestock greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and emission reductions. The framework consists of 13 guiding questions that are implemented in an eight-step assessment.

This working paper explores a generic method that can be used to benchmark nitrogen (N) input requirements for crop production and the efficiency by which inputs are used. Two types of N benchmarks are introduced: one for short-term and another for long-term assessments.

Technology adoption has been proven to be an efficient way to improve agricultural productivity as well as farmers’ income across the semi-arid regions of the globe. However, an upcoming method to improve food and livelihood security is through sustainable technology intensification.

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