The carbon footprint of food loss and waste (FLW) is estimated to be up to 3.49 gigatons of carbon dioxide equivalent (gtCO2e), representing up to 6–10% of total anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (HLPE 2014). Addressing FLW can reduce the emission intensity of the agricultural system; i.e.

The Stepwise Climate Smart Investment Pathway (Stepwise) is an approach developed by the IITA research team in collaboration with partners. Stepwise breaks down the recommended best practices that many farmers cannot afford to implement into smaller, more affordable packages that can be implemented in phases.

Since 2011, the CGIAR program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) has supported research in different parts of the world on how climate-smart technologies, practices and information can address the challenge of transitioning to climatesmart agriculture at a large scale under the new realities of climate change.

This document assesses the current state of practice for the representation of food security indicators in agricultural systems models and provides recommendations for improvements in both model formulation and the empirical evidence base underlying it.

Research suggests that extreme weather events have a negative impact on agricultural income and wellbeing of smallholder households. Climate change induced shocks can also affect people's ability to work, thereby, infuence their decisions on labor or time allocation.

The UNFCCC’s Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture creates an opening for agroforestry to take on an important role in Africa’s response to climate change.

This study presents a synthesis that is an attempt to learn lessons from projects conducted by the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS).

This paper develops a conceptual framework with an indicator-based approach to assess Climate-Smart Villages (CSVs) and applies it to case study sites in Lao PDR (Ekxang CSV), Cambodia (Rohal Suong CSV), and Vietnam (Tra Hat CSV) in Southeast Asia.

An estimated 1.06 million hectare of arable land in Bangladesh and 6.7 million hectares in India is affected by salinity. Salinity intrusion adversely affects the livelihoods of farmers, especially rice cultivators and fisherfolks, vegetations, soil quality, and infrastructure in these areas.

About half of developing countries express ambition to use agroforestry—the integration of trees with crops, livestock and other non-forest timber products—for adaptation and mitigation of climate change.

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