Net soil carbon sequestration on agricultural lands could offset 4% of annual global human-induced GHG emissions over the rest of the century and make an important contribution to meeting the targets of the Paris Agreement.

The paper proposes a ranking of the countries where forest carbon sequestration is the most cost-efficient among 166 countries for which data are available.

Moving towards net zero GHG emissions by 2050 is likely a pre-condition for avoiding global warming higher than 1.5o C by the end of the century. The land-use and agriculture sector can provide close to one third of this global commitment while ensuring food security, farmer resilience, and sustainable development.

Using land alone to remove the world’s carbon emissions to achieve ‘net zero’ by 2050 would require at least 1.6 billion hectares of new forests, equivalent to five times the size of India or more than all the farmland on the planet, reveals a new Oxfam report.

This study reviews the status of the legal recognition of the rights of Indigenous Peoples, local communities, and Afro-descendant Peoples to the carbon in their lands and territories across 31 countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

A new report from Ecosystem Marketplace, shows that funding to conserve and increase carbon stored in forests around the world has more than doubled between 2016 and 2019. But authors say forest carbon finance still falls far short of what’s needed to counter global forest loss and support increased climate ambition.

It may come as a surprise, but it has been estimated that by driving half a mile in the average car you may be emitting the same amount of CO2eq as drinking a cup of tea! At between 200 and 6 g CO2eq per cup, the tea you choose to drink is making an impact on your carbon footprint.

This report presents domestic emissions pathways required to keep to the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C limit for five countries: Viet Nam, Philippines, India, Indonesia and Japan and assesses if current 2030 climate targets are in line with these pathways. Pathways are derived from the pathways assessed in the IPCC Special Report 1.5°C.

This paper provides a comprehensive assessment of the recent and projected socio-economic development of coastal areas. It reviews the environmental pressures exerted by human activities on coastal areas, as well as the impacts of climate change that exacerbate existing challenges.

A new report from the United Nations warns that time is running out to deliver on the Paris Agreement and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and calls for rapid deployment of carbon capture use and storage (CCUS) to meet carbon neutrality targets.

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