The increasing incidence of extreme climate events has raised concerns globally about our collective future. Besides the environmental damage to the planet and declining biodiversity, it has also led to economic difficulties, and in particular the most vulnerable population in developing countries.

Rapidly expanding cities in very dry parts of the world must be turned into "green urban oases" to ensure they become both healthier places to live in and more resilient to climate change, according to this new report by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO).

This report finds that of the 979 hydropower dams currently operating in the 25 cloud forest countries, more than half depend on water from cloud forests, representing billions of dollars of electricity production that take nature’s ecosystem services for granted.

Better Forests, Better Cities evaluates how forests both inside and outside city boundaries benefit cities and their residents, and what actions cities can take to conserve, restore and sustainably manage those forests.

Net soil carbon sequestration on agricultural lands could offset 4% of annual global human-induced GHG emissions over the rest of the century and make an important contribution to meeting the targets of the Paris Agreement.

The paper proposes a ranking of the countries where forest carbon sequestration is the most cost-efficient among 166 countries for which data are available.

Moving towards net zero GHG emissions by 2050 is likely a pre-condition for avoiding global warming higher than 1.5o C by the end of the century. The land-use and agriculture sector can provide close to one third of this global commitment while ensuring food security, farmer resilience, and sustainable development.

Using land alone to remove the world’s carbon emissions to achieve ‘net zero’ by 2050 would require at least 1.6 billion hectares of new forests, equivalent to five times the size of India or more than all the farmland on the planet, reveals a new Oxfam report.

This study reviews the status of the legal recognition of the rights of Indigenous Peoples, local communities, and Afro-descendant Peoples to the carbon in their lands and territories across 31 countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

A new report from Ecosystem Marketplace, shows that funding to conserve and increase carbon stored in forests around the world has more than doubled between 2016 and 2019. But authors say forest carbon finance still falls far short of what’s needed to counter global forest loss and support increased climate ambition.

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