The use of wood for electricity generation and heat in modern (non-traditional) technologies has grown rapidly in recent years, and has the potential to continue to do so. For its supporters, it represents a relatively cheap and flexible way of supplying renewable energy, with benefits to the global climate and to forest industries.

This study, ‘Forest Carbon Assessment in Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape (CHAL) for REDD+ Readiness Activities’ presents the comprehensive baseline of forest carbon stock in CHAL with a detailed assessment of carbon sequestration potential, carbon-capture, permanency, leakage, and risks from the forest coverage.

The purpose of this study was to estimate the benefits and costs of reducing deforestation and forest degradation in different landscapes and management regimes in Nepal, and to provide associated opportunity costs of carbon that can be used as inputs for planning the implementation of REDD+ in Nepal.

A new report enables agricultural companies to set science-based greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions targets for key commodities.

This Environmental and Social Management Framework (EMSF) has been prepared in support of a project proposal for “Enhancing climate resilience of India’s coastal communities” by the Government of India (GoI) to the Green Climate Fund (GCF).

Devising agricultural management schemes that enhance food security and soil carbon levels is a high priority for many nations. However, the coupling between agricultural productivity, soil carbon stocks and organic matter turnover rates is still unclear.

This report provides the technical description of seven models on ecosystem services on a European scale. The ecosystem services included are carbon sequestration, erosion prevention, flood regulation, pollination, pest control, recreation and wild food provisioning.

Following the 2016 entry into force of the Paris Agreement, governments are now expected to turn their greenhouse gas emissions pledges into concrete climate policies.

GGGI published a report titled, ‘Bridging the Policy and Investment Gap for Payment for Ecosystem Services: Learning from the Costa Rican Experience and Roads Ahead’. This report provides findings based on the Costa Rican experiences that are beneficial for countries around the world implementing Payment for Ecosystem Services (PES) schemes.

Question raised in Lok Sabha on Carbon Capture Sequestration, 29/11/2016.

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