In essence, the notion of benefit sharing is recognition of the natural rights of affected communities over mineral resources in their traditional and historical homelands. Communities have a right to benefit first—culturally, economically and politically. These rights can be seen from the prism of both immediate as well as long-term benefits.

Africa’s economic growth has stabilized at 3.4 percent in 2019 and is expected to pick up to 3.9 percent in 2020 and 4.1 percent in 2021 but to remain below historical highs. Growth’s fundamentals are also improving, with a gradual shift from private consumption toward investment and exports.

This report presents results of an aerial wildlife survey of large animals and human activities covering the Selous-Mikumi ecosystem in Southern Tanzania.

Mangroves cut across ecosystems, sectors, jurisdictions and governance regimes. While few countries have a specific mangrove law, many national and international regimes apply to or affect mangroves in some way.

UMFULA has addressed questions of climate science, climate impacts and decision-making processes for adaptation, including: How does the climate of central and southern Africa work? And how well do climate models represent the key processes responsible for climate?

This research was undertaken in order to understand what factors have been driving stunting reduction in Tanzania over the recent past (2005-2015), and what can further accelerate progress against undernutrition in the near future (2015-2025).

The Devolved Climate Finance (DCF) mechanism is an innovative model for investing at the local level in developing countries and building sustainable and climate-resilient livelihoods. The mechanism builds on the premise that local communities have in-depth knowledge about climate variability and risks.

Dar es Salaam is frequently affected by severe flooding causing destruction and impeding daily life of its 4.5 million inhabitants.

For Tanzania to generate future income and achieve sustainable development, it is essential for the country to invest in its citizens—both children and adults—according to the new World Bank economic analysis for the country.

Scorecards are an increasingly popular instrument aiming to advance accountability for nutrition. Often devised at national level, growing interest is now emerging in subnational application.

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