Between its natural wealth with diverse cultures, increasingly rapid urbanization, and some of the world’s most impressive wildlife, Tanzania strikes visitors as a country of diversity and dynamism. At the same time, the country is facing challenges from climate change that will put its people, policymakers, and ecosystems to a test.

More than 70 per cent of Tanzania’s population lives in rural areas, which depend largely on groundwater for drinking. The country, however, lacks safely managed potable water. The best available drinking water - i.e. uncontaminated and available at the nearest point - is from the basic water services.

Managing climate risk in agriculture requires a proper understanding of climatic conditions, regional and global climatic drivers, as well as major agricultural activities at the particular location of interest.

The National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) has revealed five key setbacks that limit agriculture productivity in Tanzania. In a new report, the bureau named the issues being the limited access to extension services, slow implementation of irrigation systems, low use of fertilizers, improved seeds as well as underdeveloped mechanization.

Tanzania , home to some of the fastest-growing urban centres in East Africa, produces 12–17 million tonnes of solid waste every year. Only 50 per cent of this is collected and sent to dumpsites. The focus on waste processing is low, while disposal of waste is common.

Tourism offers Tanzania the long-term potential to create good jobs, generate foreign exchange earnings, provide revenue to support the preservation and maintenance of natural and cultural heritage, and expand the tax base to finance development expenditures and poverty-reduction efforts.

Faced with myriad options, Sub-Saharan Africa policy makers struggle to prioritize actions. Commonly used modeling approaches perform poorly in data scare conditions or focus intently on tools at hand. Policies, by consequence, report ‘wish lists’, making them a challenge to implement given resource constraints.

Around 70 per cent of Tanzania’s population lives in rural areas. Hence, sanitation challenges in the country are mainly driven by the state of sanitation in its rural areas. Only 24 per cent of rural Tanzania has access to basic sanitation facilities.

The publication Assessing the Evidence: Migration, Environment and Climate Change in the United Republic of Tanzania attempts to comprehensively address climate change impacts in the United Republic of Tanzania, current mobility patterns and trends, and the possible linkages between them.

Recent growth accelerations in Africa are characterized by increasing productivity in agriculture, a declining share of the labor force employed in agriculture and declining productivity in modern sectors such as manufacturing.

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