The UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) are stepping up their collaboration to help meet the essential needs of vulnerable people in Iraq. WFP has worked with UNHCR and partners to identify an additional 35,000 Syrian refugees and 10,000 people displaced by conflict who will be included in WFP food assistance programmes to help them cope with the impact of COVID-19.

Today, nearly 55 million people in the Arab States, 13.2 percent of the population, are hungry and the situation is particularly worrying in countries affected by conflicts and violence: Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Syria, Sudan, and Yemen.

As a complement to agency-wide efforts across all its IDP operations, UNHCR’s engagement in internal displacement will be further concretized, supported and driven forward on a focused and demonstrative basis in nine target operations, which span the internal displacement spectrum from emergency preparedness, to response, and to solutions.

Refugees and displaced people mostly depend on energy that is unsustainable and can harm their health and well-being. Sustainable energy based on renewables, in contrast, bridges the gap between humanitarian response and development, enhancing the well-being of displaced people and communities.

Existing WHO estimates of the prevalence of mental disorders in emergency settings are more than a decade old and do not reflect modern methods to gather existing data and derive estimates.

Iraq is one of the hottest countries on earth but when heavy rains do hit they can result in casualties and widespread damage because of deteriorating public infrastructure.

The death of thousands of freshwater fish in the Euphrates river in Iraq was due to high levels of coliform bacteria, heavy metals and ammonia in the water, the World Health Organization (WHO) said

Iraq’s farmlands are declining due to lack of rainfall and depleted soils, a report by the country’s Central Bureau of Statistics has revealed.

BASRA, IRAQ - The brackish water pouring from the taps of homes in Basra has caused stomach ailments and skin rashes for thousands in the southern Iraqi city once famous for its network of freshwat

Dozens of water buffalo in Iraq's southeastern wetlands have died because of low water levels in the marshes, threatening the livelihoods of a community of marsh dwellers that has made the area its

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