Millions of children in Yemen could be pushed to ‘the brink of starvation’ due to huge shortfalls in humanitarian aid funding amid the COVID-19 pandemic – according to a new UNICEF report marking more than five years since conflict escalated in the country.

International donors are coming together today, convened by the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the United Nations, to raise needed funds for the life-saving humanitarian response in Yemen. More than 130 governments and other donors, international humanitarian organizations and aid officials will meet virtually to raise awareness about the rapidly deteriorating humanitarian situation in Yemen – where COVID-19 is just the latest challenge - and announce pledges of financial support to the ongoing aid operation.

At a time when governments around the world are asking people to stay at home and limit their travel to contain the spread of Covid-19, armed conflict and violence are forcing hundreds of thousands to flee. Between 23 March and 15 May 2020, armed conflict in 19 countries has displaced at least 661,000 people.

At the beginning of April, the 2020 edition of the Global Report on Food Crises was issued, presenting a stark warning for the future. In 2019 – prior to the COVID-19 pandemic – 135 million people experienced “crisis” and worse levels of acute food insecurity. A further 183 million were on the edge in “stressed” food security conditions.

Since the start of the desert locust upsurge in the Greater Horn of Africa and Yemen just over four months ago, and the subsequent launch of FAO’s crisis appeal in January, a total of USD 130 million has been mobilized (85 percent of the requested USD 153 million).

The number of internally displaced people (IDPs) around the world has reached an all-time high, according to a new report from the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC), part of the Norwegian Refugee Council. This year's GRID breaks down data by conflict, violence and disasters across 145 countries.

The Early Warning Early Action (EWEA) report on food security and agriculture is developed by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO).

ACAPS' Global Risk Analysis outlines a number of key contexts where a notable deterioration may occur within the next six months, leading to a spike in humanitarian needs. ACAPS analysts conduct daily monitoring and independent analysis of more than 150 countries to support evidence-based decision-making in the humanitarian sector.

When mobility drivers are scrutinised and climate change is found to play a role in movement, it remains difficult to determine the extent of its influence. Misleading claims about mass migration induced by climate change continue to surface in both academia and policy.

In conflict and disaster, children suffer first and suffer most. Today, one in four of the world’s children lives in a conflict or disaster zone — a fact that should shake each of us to our core. All of these children face an uncertain future. Around the world, more than 30 million children have been displaced by conflict.

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