New analysis reveals the number of children living in multidimensional poverty – without access to education, health, housing, nutrition, sanitation, or water – has increased by 15 per cent since the start of the pandemic.

The point of the report is to track (and promote) progress toward the Sustainable Development Goals, and the big thing standing in the way of that progress right now is the pandemic. People living just above the extreme poverty line who have fallen below it because of COVID-19 were obviously vulnerable despite not being officially poor.

Countries around the world are taking broad public health and social measures (PHSM), including closure of schools, to prevent the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes COVID-19.1 This Annex examines considerations for school operations, including openings, closures and re-openings and the measures needed to minimize the risk to students

With the number of under-five deaths at an all-time recorded low of 5.2 million in 2019, disruptions in child and maternal health services due to the COVID-19 pandemic are putting millions of additional lives at stake.

This report shows Canadian children are much less safe and healthy than before the pandemic began. In particular, it highlights the top 10 threats to children: unintentional injuries, poor mental health, child abuse, poverty, infant mortality, physical inactivity, food insecurity, racism, preventable illnesses and bullying.

This paper examines the main risks faced by the migrant children in Trinidad and Tobago and the exacerbating impact of COVID-19 outbreak due to: i) disruption to education, ii) rising unemployment, iii) risks to mental health and safety, and iv) to child nutrition and health.

The findings reveal elevated mental health problems and infectious diseases in this population.

Injuries are the leading cause of preventable death in children and young people, and of preventable years of life lost up to age 65. As such, they present a significant cost to individuals, society, and the economy. They also contribute to injustice, with children from poorer backgrounds being more likely to die as a result of an injury.

As schools worldwide struggle with reopening,the latest data from the WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) reveal that 43 per cent of schools around the world lacked access to basic handwashing with soap and water in 2019 – a key condition for schools to be able to operate safely in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Based on assessments in 24 countries across Latin America, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Asia, it shows that 85 million households in Asia now have limited or no food supplies, with 8 million children forced into child labour or begging. In Latin America, every third Venezuelan migrant child is going to bed hungry.

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