UNICEF warned in a new report of significant and growing consequences for children as the COVID-19 pandemic lurches toward a second year. Released ahead of World Children’s Day, Averting a Lost COVID Generation is the first UNICEF report to comprehensively outline the dire and growing consequences for children as the pandemic drags on.

Over the past decade, the Gambia has registered some progress in improving the nutritional status of children, particularly the reduction of the prevalence of stunting, wasting and underweight among children under five years of age.

The Cost of Hunger in Africa (COHA) is an African Union Commission (AUC) led initiative through which countries are able to estimate the social and economic impact of child undernutrition in a given year. About 16 countries are initially participating in the study. Sudan is part of the phase VI countries.

COVID-19-related health service disruptions could worsen the situation, potentially adding nearly 200,000 more stillbirths over a 12-month period warn the estimates released by UNICEF, the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Bank Group and the Population Division of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs

Cooking school meals requires energy. In some countries, families are asked to contribute to fuel expenses or to provide firewood, failing which, children may be refused school meals. The acquisition of fuel, whether it is purchased or collected, is a considerable burden for schools that risks hindering the scale and scope of WFP’s programmes.

Seven hundred thousand more children face hunger in Syria owing to the country’s badly-damaged economy, partly due to the impact of the COVID-19 restrictions. It means in the last six months, the total number of food insecure children across the country has risen to more than 4.6 million.

New analysis reveals the number of children living in multidimensional poverty – without access to education, health, housing, nutrition, sanitation, or water – has increased by 15 per cent since the start of the pandemic.

The point of the report is to track (and promote) progress toward the Sustainable Development Goals, and the big thing standing in the way of that progress right now is the pandemic. People living just above the extreme poverty line who have fallen below it because of COVID-19 were obviously vulnerable despite not being officially poor.

Countries around the world are taking broad public health and social measures (PHSM), including closure of schools, to prevent the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes COVID-19.1 This Annex examines considerations for school operations, including openings, closures and re-openings and the measures needed to minimize the risk to students

With the number of under-five deaths at an all-time recorded low of 5.2 million in 2019, disruptions in child and maternal health services due to the COVID-19 pandemic are putting millions of additional lives at stake.

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