The WHO/UNICEF JMP has expanded its global databases to include WASH in health care facilities. The 2019 global baseline report includes harmonized national estimates as well as regional and global estimates for 2016.

One in four health care facilities around the world lack basic water services, impacting over 2 billion people, according to a new report by the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene (JMP).

Meeting the goals of the Paris Agreement could save about a million lives a year worldwide by 2050 through reductions in air pollution alone.

The Household Energy Assessment Rapid Tool (HEART) was developed by WHO and is being pilot-tested for use in conducting rapid situational assessments and stakeholder mapping of a country’s readiness to address access to clean energy technologies.

This document provides practical guidance to support the development or revision of customized national or subnational drinking-water quality regulations and standards. The principles and guidance presented are broadly applicable across countries and contexts, including more resource-limited settings.

This report takes a detailed look at the current status of childhood immunization in 10 priority countries: Afghanistan, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan and Uganda.

Low quality healthcare costs time and money says this new report published by the World Health Organization (WHO) , Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and the World Bank. Poor quality health services are holding back progress on improving health in countries at all income levels, not just low- and middle-income countries, the report said.

WHO has launched new guidance on tobacco product regulation in response to the need for clear, practical advice on building laboratory testing capacity.

At least half of the world’s population cannot obtain essential health services, according to a new report from the World Bank and WHO. And each year, large numbers of households are being pushed into poverty because they must pay for health care out of their own pockets.

This report showcases the state of inequality in Indonesia, drawing from the latest available data across 11 health topics (53 health indicators), and eight dimensions of inequality.

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