At present, our ability to comprehend the dynamics of food systems and the consequences of their rapid ‘transformations’ is limited. In this paper, we propose to address this gap by exploring the interactions between the sustainability of food systems and a set of key drivers at the global scale.

It is well documented that treatment for severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is effective. However, little is known about the long-term outcomes for children treated for SAM. We sought to trace former SAM patients 11 to 30 years after their discharge from hospital, and to describe their longer-term survival and their growth to adulthood.

The World Health Organization (WHO) spells out the need to step up cancer services in low- and middle-income countries. WHO warns that, if current trends continue, the world will see a 60% increase in cancer cases over the next two decades. The greatest increase (an estimated 81%) in new cases will occur in low- and middle-income countries, where survival rates are currently lowest.

Global cancer burden is still increasing and if current trends continue, the world will see a 60% increase in cancer cases over the next two decades warns WHO.

Actions to address different forms of malnutrition are typically managed by separate communities, policies, programmes, governance structures, and funding streams. By contrast, double-duty actions, which aim to simultaneously tackle both undernutrition and problems of overweight, obesity, and diet-related non-communicable diseases (DR-NCDs) have been proposed as a way to effectively address malnutrition in all its forms in a more holisitic way. This Series paper identifies ten double-duty actions that have strong potential to reduce the risk of both undernutrition, obesity, and DR-NCDs.

Observations from many countries indicate that multiple forms of malnutrition might coexist in a country, a household, and an individual. In this Series, the double burden of malnutrition (DBM) encompasses undernutrition in the form of stunting, and overweight and obesity. Health effects of the DBM include those associated with both undernutrition, such as impaired childhood development and greater susceptibility to infectious diseases, and overweight, especially in terms of increased risk of added visceral fat and increased risk of non-communicable diseases.

A new report by the World Health Organization offers guidance and tools for urban leaders to tackle some of the leading causes of death in cities. Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) - like heart disease, stroke, cancer and diabetes - kill 41 million people worldwide every year, and road traffic crashes kill 1.35 million.

The adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals have provided a framework within which to strengthen actions to improve health and well-being for all and ensure no one is left behind.

It is in the interest of the consumers, the food industry and the nation that the dangers of junk food are disclosed and widely disseminated

Question raised in Rajya Sabha on Phenomenal Increase in Noncommunicable Diseases (NCDs) in India, 02/07/2019.

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