Actions to address different forms of malnutrition are typically managed by separate communities, policies, programmes, governance structures, and funding streams. By contrast, double-duty actions, which aim to simultaneously tackle both undernutrition and problems of overweight, obesity, and diet-related non-communicable diseases (DR-NCDs) have been proposed as a way to effectively address malnutrition in all its forms in a more holisitic way. This Series paper identifies ten double-duty actions that have strong potential to reduce the risk of both undernutrition, obesity, and DR-NCDs.

Observations from many countries indicate that multiple forms of malnutrition might coexist in a country, a household, and an individual. In this Series, the double burden of malnutrition (DBM) encompasses undernutrition in the form of stunting, and overweight and obesity. Health effects of the DBM include those associated with both undernutrition, such as impaired childhood development and greater susceptibility to infectious diseases, and overweight, especially in terms of increased risk of added visceral fat and increased risk of non-communicable diseases.

A new report by the World Health Organization offers guidance and tools for urban leaders to tackle some of the leading causes of death in cities. Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) - like heart disease, stroke, cancer and diabetes - kill 41 million people worldwide every year, and road traffic crashes kill 1.35 million.

The adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals have provided a framework within which to strengthen actions to improve health and well-being for all and ensure no one is left behind.

It is in the interest of the consumers, the food industry and the nation that the dangers of junk food are disclosed and widely disseminated

Question raised in Rajya Sabha on Phenomenal Increase in Noncommunicable Diseases (NCDs) in India, 02/07/2019.

Among social groups, stunting is highest amongst children from the Scheduled Tribes (43.6%), followed by Scheduled Castes (42.5%) and Other Backwards Castes (38.6%).
State of deficit

Regular health checks are key: Apollo Hospitals chairman

More than 94,000 people die of non communicable diseases (NCDs) in Ghana every year, a study by the Ghana Non-Communicable Disease Alliance (GhNCDA) has revealed.

Adapting to the evolved understanding of Concept of Primary Health (PHC), the Health and Wellness Centres (HWCs)under the ambit of ‘Ayushman Bharat’yojna are providing services directed towards the

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