Diabetes and high body-mass index (BMI) are associated with increased risk of several cancers, and are increasing in prevalence in most countries. Researchers estimated the cancer incidence attributable to diabetes and high BMI as individual risk factors and in combination, by country and sex.

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Experts say foods high in salt, sugar and fat are leading to rise in such ailments

NEW DELHI: Highlighting major links between environment and health, a study released here on Monday held lifestyle diseases like obesity, mental health, cancer and heart diseases to count a few, as

Lifestyle diseases or non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are responsible for more than 61 per cent of all deaths in India.

Whether it is heart diseases, respiratory illnesses, cancer, obesity or food allergies, emerging research reveals that the rise in their incidences is due to environmental factors—rapid urbanisation, air pollution and changes in diet—rather than your genes.

The new report from Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) released yesterday held lifestyle diseases like obesity, mental health, cancer and heart diseases to count a few, as the major killers in India. Revealing the links of air pollution with mental diseases, it stated that air pollution is responsible for 30 per cent of premature deaths in India while every third child in Delhi has impaired lungs.

KOCHI: The health policy introduced by the state government envisages several instrumental changes in the health sector in Kerala.

The bill providing for the implementation of a tax on sugary beverages — the health promotion levy — was passed by the National Assembly on Tuesday.

The number of stunted children in Africa is on the rise, according to the newly released nutrition report by the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Africa.

When a condition commonly associated with a lifetime of alcohol abuse — severe scarring of the liver, or cirrhosis — starts to show up in children as young as eight, something is very wrong.

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Few large multicity studies have been conducted in developing countries to address the acute health effects of atmospheric ozone pollution. The researchers explored the associations between ozone and daily cause-specific mortality in China.

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