Household air pollution (HAP) is the eighth leading risk factor for global disease burden, contributing to 2.9 million yearly premature deaths. Nearly 80% of the sub-Saharan population and about 90 million households in Nigeria use biomass as their primary fuel for cooking and energy needs, which can adversely impact their health. Exposure to air pollution has been linked to adverse pregnancy outcomes like stillbirth, preeclampsia, preterm birth, low birth weight, reduced fetal head circumference, miscarriage, and intra-uterine fetal growth retardation (IUGR).

HYDERABAD: The dengue season, which is usually over by September-end, still continues to torment the state this year with 20-25 cases being reported each day.

This adds to the growing body of evidence showing the negative cardiovascular and respiratory impacts of even a short, two-hour exposure to motor traffic pollution

High-level political commitment stressed

Lifestyle diseases or non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are responsible for more than 61 per cent of all deaths in India.

Whether it is heart diseases, respiratory illnesses, cancer, obesity or food allergies, emerging research reveals that the rise in their incidences is due to environmental factors—rapid urbanisation, air pollution and changes in diet—rather than your genes.

The new report from Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) released yesterday held lifestyle diseases like obesity, mental health, cancer and heart diseases to count a few, as the major killers in India. Revealing the links of air pollution with mental diseases, it stated that air pollution is responsible for 30 per cent of premature deaths in India while every third child in Delhi has impaired lungs.

NEW DELHI: Children in Delhi have a far lower lung capacity and lung growth rate than kids of the same age in the US, according to a recent study by the department of pulmonary medicine at the Vall

BENGALURU: It's not just suspended particulate matter that is choking Bengaluru.

JAIPUR: It has come as a shocker for city's pulmonologists when they noticed that numbers patients with respiratory diseases have not gone down even after one month of Diwali, which was a usual tre

Air pollution exposure is the second most important risk factor for ill health in South Asia, contributing to between 13% and 21.7% of all deaths and approximately 58 million disability adjusted life years (DALYs) through chronic and acute respiratory and cardiovascular illnesses.1 Of the top 30 cities in the world with the poorest air quality in 2016, 17 are in South Asia.2 The impact of air pollution transcends boundaries. The “brown cloud”—caused by pollution from carbon aerosols—is a phenomenon captured in satellite images of atmospheric haze over South Asia, as well as China.

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