Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are a category of chronic, disabling, and at times disfiguring diseases and conditions that occur most commonly in the setting of extreme poverty. Historically, NTDs have received less attention and funding when compared to other diseases occurring in the same regions of the world.

WHO releases a new progress report, entitled “Global report on neglected tropical diseases 2023” highlighting the progress and challenges in delivering NTD care worldwide, against a backdrop of COVID-19-related disruptions.

The road map 2030 was developed by WHO through an extensive global consultation, with indicators set for measuring progress against targets and milestones. This compendium of indicators provides a comprehensive and standardized listing of recommended indicators, including the 70 core indicators presented in the M&E framework.

Financing the acceleration of the progress needed to reach the NTD 2030 targets was highlighted throughout the global consultation on which the road map was based and, for some time, a lack of resources has been seen as a significant barrier to the control, elimination and eradication of NTDs.

The Strategy supports the achievement of the targets of the 2021-2030 road map on neglected tropical diseases (NTDs).

Several viruses from the genus Orthohantavirus are known to cause lethal disease in humans. Sigmodontinae rodents are the main hosts responsible for hantavirus transmission in the tropical forests, savannas, and wetlands of South America. These rodents can shed different hantaviruses, such as the lethal and emerging Araraquara orthohantavirus.

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Mycetoma is a chronic mutilating disease of the skin and the underlying tissues caused by fungi or bacteria.

NAIROBI (Xinhua) -- Kenya on Thursday announced an elaborate plan to eliminate trachoma, elephantiasis, mother to child transmission of HIV and congenital syphilis.

The concept of the neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) is built around low socioeconomic status (SES) and poverty as the most important social determinants [1]. Poor health is not confined to poor people, but the burden of poor health is disproportionately greater within poor communities. A combination of insufficient social programs, unfair economic arrangements, and corrupt politics creates conditions that allow poverty to obstruct health [2]. Within this paradigm is the impact of violent conflict.

Venomous snakebite is a global serious health issue and in India high rate of mortality is caused by Naja naja (Indian cobra). To evaluate anti-cobra venom activity and identify lead molecules in Aegle marmelos, in vitro and in silico screening was carried out. Leaves, stem and root bark of A. marmelos were extracted in ethanol, methanol and hexane and maximum yield was obtained in methanol.

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