The year 2021 gave us many reasons for hope. With diagnostic, therapeutic and immunization advances, science offered solutions to kickstart recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic and its devastating effects.

The population of South Africa is estimated to be 60,6 million by the end of June 2022. Between 2002 and 2022 South Africa experienced a positive population growth year-on-year. A positive growth rate indicates that the population is increasing, despite the devastating impact of COVID-19 globally and within South Africa’s borders.

Around the world, millions of refugees and migrants in vulnerable situations, such as low-skilled migrant workers, face poorer health outcomes than their host communities, especially where living and working conditions are sub-standard, according to this report by the WHO.

15 November 2022 is predicted to be the day that the global population reaches eight billion. The projection is revealed in this UN’s World Population Prospects 2022 report, which also shows that India is on course to surpass China as the world’s most populous country in 2023.

After the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic in March 2020, 0.7 per cent of the country’s population was a ‘temporary visitor’ in households during July 2020-June 2021, a report named ‘Migration in India 2020-21’, released by the Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation (MoSPI) showed.

The COVID-19 pandemic has drastically affected global mobility since its outbreak in early 2020. It has taken the lives of millions and led to wholesale changes at all levels in the way people interact, move and work. By mid-March 2022, at least 476 million people had contracted the infection, and some six million died from COVID-19 (WHO 2022).

Over the past two decades, the causal relationship between climate change and migration has gained increasing prominence on the international political agenda.

The populations of African cities are expected to grow by more than 900 million by 2050. Many of these people will live in secondary cities. These cities are a sub‑set of cities within national systems of cities.

This paper presents empirical evidence on the links between climate change, migration and trafficking. It then unpacks the underlying drivers that policymakers should target to deal with this nexus.

This study examines the nexus between climate change, migration and conflict within Asia, with particular attention to Afghanistan, Bangladesh and Myanmar, the three Asian countries where the Danish Refugee Council is currently active, as well as the experiences of Afghans in Pakistan, Iran and Turkey, and of Rohingya people in Malaysia, Indones

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