Tracking and reporting on CRI investment is essential but challenging. Tracking CRI investments allows us to measure progress on the resilience goals of the Paris Agreement and understand investment gaps, barriers, and opportunities to further scale and channel finance into geographies and sectors that need it most.

The drought in the Greater Horn of Africa (GHoA) is predicted to continue into the late annual rainy season (Figure 1). For the first time in 40 years, four consecutive seasons of below-normal rains have been recorded in the GHoA countries.

As the intensity and frequency of extreme weather events rise, more needs to be done to anticipate, mitigate and prevent their impact on the food security of the world’s most vulnerable people.

People in Asia and the Pacific were displaced more than 225 million times due to disasters triggered by natural hazards from 2010 to 2021, accounting for more than three-quarters of the global number, according to this report by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC).

A long-lasting drought is affecting Somalia, coastal regions of Kenya and Tanzania, and central-eastern Ethiopia. After two years of below-average rainy seasons, severe and persistent drought conditions are leading to severe soil moisture deficit and are affecting the agricultural sector and increasing wild-fire danger.

The study argues that the nature of risk – viz., relatively slow emergence of drought compared to sudden manifestation of flood events, could perhaps provide scope for partisan politics.

In Ethiopia, nearly 10 million people, including 4.4 million children, are in urgent need of humanitarian assistance in drought-impacted areas. Four consecutive failed rainy seasons have brought on severe drought in Ethiopia’s lowland regions of Afar, Oromia, the Southern Nations Nationalities, Peoples’ (SNNPR) and Somali regions.

This publication shows how the three pillars of drought management: (1) monitoring; (2) vulnerability assessment; and (3) risk mitigation and response, help to integrate the management of the two phenomena.

A report into the impact of climate change on cities, which is becoming increasingly important as more and more people live in them. One of the most severe impacts, which is already starting to bite, is cities running out of water.

Humanity is “at a crossroads” when it comes to managing drought and accelerating mitigation must be done “urgently, using every tool we can,” says this new report from the UNCCD.

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