While the world continues to grapple with the devastating consequences of coronavirus, leading conservationist organisation WWF has called for urgent global action to address the key drivers which will cause future zoonotic disease outbreaks.

Exotic wild animals are being smuggled into Japan and once past Customs border controls, continue to be legally sold as pets finds a new TRAFFIC report, Crossing the red line: Japan’s exotic pet trade. The study also highlights the potential for the exotic pet trade to facilitate the transmission of zoonotic diseases.

Emerging infectious diseases in humans are frequently caused by pathogens originating from animal hosts, and zoonotic disease outbreaks present a major challenge to global health. To investigate drivers of virus spillover, we evaluated the number of viruses mammalian species have shared with humans.

The recent outbreak of COVID-19 has brought the link between zoonotic diseases – those transmitted from animals to humans – and wildlife markets into sharp focus.

Since the first reports of novel pneumonia (COVID-19) in Wuhan, Hubei province, China, there has been considerable discussion on the origin of the causative virus, SARS-CoV-23 (also referred to as HCoV-19).

African swine fever (ASF), is a highly contagious viral disease of domestic and wild pigs that has become a serious global threat to the pig industry and related sectors. Its existence and rampant spread has made a significant impact on protein availability, consumption and trade.

Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the causative agent of foot-and-mouth disease, a highly contagious, economically important viral disease. The structural protein VP1 plays significant roles during FMDV infection. Here, we identified that VP1 interacted with host ribosomal protein SA (RPSA).

Coronaviruses (CoVs) primarily cause enzootic infections in birds and mammals but, in the last few decades, have shown to be capable of infecting humans as well. The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2003 and, more recently, Middle-East respiratory syndrome (MERS) has demonstrated the lethality of CoVs when they cross th

Most human hantavirus infections occur in Asia, but some cases have been described in Europe in travelers returning from Asia.

Despite Nipah virus outbreaks having high mortality rates (>70% in Southeast Asia), there are no licensed drugs against it.

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