An 18-year-old girl died on the spot while three others sustained severe injuries when a massive landslide triggered by heavy downpour hit Chimpu village here.

Union Minister of State for Home Kiren Rijiju took to Twitter and tweeted: ?

An environment ministry panel has decided to hold back clearance to 600 MW Tawang hydroelectric project in strategic Tawang Valley in Arunachal Pradesh keeping in mind the biodiversity rich forest

Forest panel finds studies about the impact on flora and fauna in Arunachal Pradesh’s Dibang valley not up to the mark

NHPC has accepted recommendations of expert panels on downstream impact issue, Assam stands to get 533 MW power once project is completed: Pallab Lochon Das

The Centre is keen to start the hydro power projects in the state.

The pangolin, now recognised as the world’s most trafficked mammal, is currently undergoing population collapse across South and Southeast Asia, primarily because of the medicinal value attributed to its meat and scales. This paper explores how scarcity and alterity (otherness) drive the perceived value of these creatures for a range of human and more-than-human stakeholders: wildlife traffickers, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) practitioners, Asian consumers of their meat and scales, hunters and poachers, pangolin-rearing master-spirits, and conservation organisations.

Human-nature relations are diverse, multifaceted and often contradictory, especially the relationships with animals. Mishmi people living on the Sino-India border claim tigers to be their brothers and take credit for tiger protection as they observe taboos against hunting tigers. Drawing on this notion of relatedness with tigers, local residents of the Dibang Valley question the governments’ recent plans to declare the Dibang Wildlife Sanctuary into Dibang Tiger Reserve and its scientific surveys of tigers and habitat mapping.

Opposition leader Debabrata Saikia has written a letter to Prime Minister Narendra Modi requesting to hold the much-delayed tripartite meeting for examining the expert committee report on the stall

This research was carried out with the Adi and Galo tribes of East Siang and West Siang districts of Arunachal Pradesh, India to understand fishing methods employed by them using stones and boulders occurring in the river beds of small tributaries of the Siang River in the study area. The identified sustainable fishing technique is locally known as Lipum and practised by these communities. The capture of fish ranged from 4-10 kg per Lipum and one person could make 3-4 different Lipum structures per day.

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