The WFP Centre of Excellence against Hunger is a global hub for knowledge exchange, capacity development and technical assistance to assist countries achieve zero hunger while it supports national ownership of programmes that guarantee sustainability of actions.

To finance their progress, developing countries must inevitably find ways to overcome challenges. One major issue that these countries face is that investors often perceive developing countries as carrying a high financial risk, which limits their ability to access to international capital markets.

The Sustainable Development Goal 7 (SDG7) mandate to ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy services for all, means that even the poorest and most disadvantaged in society should have access to modern energy by 2030.

By many measures, the world is still in the early stages of a deep and profound transformation in energy, and industrial and agricultural processes. The aim of that transition is to achieve new policy goals for modern societies – among them, deep cuts in carbon dioxide and other warming gases.

As the renewable energy sector matures, policies must be adapted to reflect changing market conditions. With the increasing use of auctions, policymakers seek to procure renewables-based electricity at the lowest price and also fulfil socio-economic objectives.

Actions to address different forms of malnutrition are typically managed by separate communities, policies, programmes, governance structures, and funding streams. By contrast, double-duty actions, which aim to simultaneously tackle both undernutrition and problems of overweight, obesity, and diet-related non-communicable diseases (DR-NCDs) have been proposed as a way to effectively address malnutrition in all its forms in a more holisitic way. This Series paper identifies ten double-duty actions that have strong potential to reduce the risk of both undernutrition, obesity, and DR-NCDs.

For the first time, this report brings together official data on governments’ revenues and subsidies associated with fossil fuels in Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (referred to collectively as BRICS). It offers initial recommendations on aligning BRICS's fiscal policies with a clean energy transition.

Brazil and Africa share similar environmental, climate and social conditions, and both face similar development challenges. This creates interesting opportunities for South-South collaboration through technology transfer in several areas, including agriculture, climate change mitigation and adaptation, and value chains development.

Brazil and Africa share similar environmental, climate and social conditions, and both face similar development challenges. This creates interesting opportunities for South-South collaboration through technology transfer in several areas, including agriculture, climate change mitigation and adaptation, and value chains development.

National development banks (NDBs) and development finance institutions – domestically focused, publicly owned financial institutions with a specific development mandate – are poised to play a role in bridging the investment gap for climate-compatible infrastructure in developing countries.

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