The link between increasingly severe climate events and the rising suicide rate among India’s farmers has long been a concern.

India’s rural economy, largely dependent on rainfed agriculture, is increasingly vulnerable to climate change. More frequent, intense heatwaves and unpredictable rains undermine farmers’ efforts to protect crops and sustain their families.

Developing countries — especially least developed countries (LDCs) and Small Island Developing States (SIDS) — face huge challenges in financing their current climate and nature needs.

Least Developed Countries (LDCs) are facing increasingly devastating impacts of climate change that are leading to loss and damage (L&D). As LDCs revise their climate action plans known as Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), they should provide concrete evidence about L&D.

This paper presents a detailed overview of the nature of loss and damage risks affecting low-income countries, marginalised groups and people living in poverty in the global South, and how they might be addressed.

Sixty per cent of low-income countries are already in or at high risk of debt distress, while the global economic and debt sustainability outlook is quickly deteriorating due to higher interest rates, higher food prices and depreciating currencies.

How can cities promote resilient, low-carbon and just urbanisation, in a context of increasing climate breakdown and inequality?. IIED’s urban researchers set out a vision for urban transformation to build just and inclusive cities.

This paper presents empirical evidence on the links between climate change, migration and trafficking. It then unpacks the underlying drivers that policymakers should target to deal with this nexus.

Climate-related disasters put millions of people at risk of displacement. To effectively plan and deliver disaster risk reduction and response plans in contexts at risk of disaster displacement, governments and humanitarian agencies require good quality assessments of displacement risk.

Loss and damage is an urgent issue: the world’s least-resourced communities and countries are increasingly unable to adapt to or absorb worsening climate impacts. Greater international support is overdue, but the realities and costs of loss and damage remain poorly understood and information is not systematically shared.

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