Engaging burgeoning youth populations in developing country agriculture is seen as an important strategy toward effective, efficient, and sustainable food system transformation.

The paper provides evidence on the evolving socioeconomic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic among households in Ethiopia, Malawi, Nigeria, and Uganda. The data allow estimating the immediate economic impacts of the pandemic, beginning in April 2020, and tracking how the situation evolved through September 2020.

The brief leverages COVID-19 high frequency phone survey (HFPS) data collected primarily by National Statistics Offices (NSO) 2 of five SSA countries (Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Malawi, Nigeria, and Uganda), with support from the World Bank’s Living Standards Measurement Study (LSMS) and the Poverty and Equity Global Practice teams.

Many cities and urban centers around the world experience high air pollution episodes attributable to increased anthropogenic alterations of natural environmental systems. World Health Organization estimates indicate strong exceedances of prescribed limits in developing countries.

A country profile to support an inclusive, participatory, evidence-based, and gender-responsive National Adaptation Plan (NAP) process in Uganda.

Effective and progressive civil society movements are critical for tackling poverty and protecting the environment in low-income countries. Strengthening the capacity of citizens and advocacy organisations can therefore be a meaningful contribution to local, national and international efforts to shape development sector policy.

Producers trading in informal agricultural markets in low- and middle-income countries make daily choices concerning their livelihood and marketing strategies. Different contexts present varying degrees of market power and knowledge asymmetries across value chains and trading relations.

In 2006, Uganda’s hopes of developing an oil industry were boosted by the confirmation of “commercially recoverable” quantities of oil in the Albertine Basin. By 2013, three international oil companies were lined up to develop the oil fields with first oil expected in 2018.

Uganda’s real GDP grew at 2.9 percent in FY20, less than half the 6.8 percent recorded in FY19, due to the effects of the COVID-19 (coronavirus) crisis, and is expected to grow at a similar level in FY21, but downside risks are high.

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the attempts to limit its spread have resulted in profound economic impacts, and a significant contraction in the global economy is expected.

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