This working paper draws on the latest economic research to demonstrate how climate policy and investments in low-carbon infrastructure can reboot America’s economy and set it up for long-term success.

This working paper draws on the latest economic research to demonstrate how climate policy and investments in low-carbon infrastructure can reboot America’s economy and set it up for long-term success.

The ocean and its resources provide key ecosystem services and benefits that are crucial for human well being and the prosperity of the global economy, but these services are at risk.

Impact investors have been criticized for investing mainly in foreign-owned clean energy access companies and ignoring local entrepreneurs in Africa. This working paper looks at the investments made by impact investors in clean energy access in Kenya, which has been the hub of renewable energy access investment in Africa.

The Local Government Renewable Actions Tracker (hereafter referred to as the “Tracker”) is a resource developed by the American Cities Climate Challenge Renewables Accelerator, a partnership between World Resources Institute (WRI) and Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) to help local governments procure renewable electricity.

Financial analyses, which consider financial costs and income, have typically informed energy-related decision-making and investment planning. Economic analyses, however, take societal impacts as a whole, and include social, economic and environmental costs and benefits, which are especially critical in energy policymaking and planning.

Population and economic growth, as well as climate change, have pushed water crises to the top of the global agenda. Given the scale of the issues, delivering sustainable water management requires rapid mobilization of funding for water-related improvements and more effective use of existing resources.

Conservation, restoration, and improved management of forests are cost-effective solutions for large-scale reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and removal of carbon from the atmosphere and thus help to hold the global temperature increase to well below 2.0°C or 1.5°C above preindustrial levels.

Cities must ensure universal access to safe, reliable and affordable sanitation so that all urban residents can lead productive, healthy and thriving lives.

Limiting global warming to 2 or 1.5°C requires a virtually decarbonized power sector by 2050.The world is not on track to achieve this. In 2018, while renewable energy (RE) generated ¼ of global power, coal produced 38%, and remained the largest source of electricity generation, producing 30% of global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions.

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