Understanding the determinants of improved agricultural technology adoption is an important component of increasing agricultural productivity and incomes of smallholders to reduce poverty and hunger, which are the top two Sustainable Development Goals.

Almost 690 million people around the world went hungry in 2019. As progress in fighting hunger stalls, the COVID-19 pandemic is intensifying the vulnerabilities and inadequacies of global food systems.

The Independent Evaluation Office of IFAD (IOE) has prepared a project performance evaluation (PPE) report on the Tejaswini Rural Women’s Empowerment Programme. The project was implemented in India, in the states of Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra, between 2007 and 2018.

The Rural Livelihoods and Economic Empowerment Programme (RLEEP) has laid a good foundation for pro-poor value chain development. Small-scale farmers have increased their awareness that farming is a business. A number of useful partnerships were built and promising initiatives started.

Today, nearly 55 million people in the Arab States, 13.2 percent of the population, are hungry and the situation is particularly worrying in countries affected by conflicts and violence: Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Syria, Sudan, and Yemen.

This baseline report was undertaken as part of the impact assessment of the Yield Uganda Investment Fund (YUIF), a EUR 20 million impact fund that provides targeted financing to small and medium agribusinesses (SMAs) in Uganda to help them overcome barriers to accessing capital.

The Independent Office of Evaluation of IFAD (IOE) has prepared a project performance evaluation (PPE) of the Rehabilitation and Community-based Poverty Reduction Project (RCPRP) in the Republic of Sierra Leone, implemented in the country from 2006 to 2017.

While the number of people living in extreme poverty fell from nearly 2 billion in 1990 to 736 million in 2015, and hunger has declined for decades, the poorest and most marginalized people continue to be left behind. More than 820 million people go hungry every day, and the wealth gap is widening.

A narrative on rural youth in Africa has continued to evolve in policy circles around the world. Much of it is driven by population statistics that point to an imminent youth bulge in Africa and concerns about economic stagnation for the continent.

A narrative on rural youth in Africa has continued to evolve in policy circles around the world. Much of it is driven by population statistics that point to an imminent youth bulge in Africa and concerns about economic stagnation for the continent.

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