Around one third of the food globally produced is estimated to be lost or wasted along the supply chain. These losses affect disproportionally developing countries, which have the highest numbers of hungry and malnourished people.

There are different views around the future of smallholder agriculture and its potential to contribute to the needed transformations of agriculture and rural economies.

Agrobiodiversity is a resource that supports human and environmental wellbeing.

Effective policies and investments are urgently needed if the world's poorest countries are to offer a future to hundreds of millions of marginalized young people living in rural areas, according to a new report by the United Nations' International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD).

Agriculture and rural development research will play a critical role in meeting the ambitious targets under SDGs 1 and 2. In recent years there has been heightened emphasis on both the rigorous evaluation of development interventions and systematic reviews and meta-analyses based on such evaluations.

This analysis examines the dynamics of youth employment in agriculture and the agri-food system in Tanzania and Malawi. The study finds that when extending the definition of a farmer beyond household heads, the average age of 'farmers' is 34 years in Tanzania and 31 years in Malawi.

International discussions on climate change increasingly recognize the importance of agriculture in adaptation and mitigation efforts. Adaptation has been generally prioritized in the most vulnerable countries, where a failure to adapt can constitute a threat to food security.

The International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) released its latest report on the transformation of rural areas, renewing its commitment to empower young people in developing countries as agents of change.

This paper aims to better understand the context in which smallholder farms operate.

The International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) launch new publication on Support to Farmers’ Organizations in Africa Programmes.

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