Transforming food systems under a changing climate entails amplifying solutions that build sustainability along multiple interconnected principles—i.e., diversity, resilience, equity, economic viability, health and renewability.

Agricultural production in East Africa is mainly rain-fed, making it highly sensitive and vulnerable to increased climate variability arising from climate change (EAC 2017a). Climate vulnerability is also exacerbated by reduced produce quality, land degradation, declining soil fertility and imperfect insurance and credit markets.

This Info Note discusses gender-based barriers to climate-smart agriculture adoption in Northern Uganda and the opportunities for gender-responsive climate-smart agriculture.

Low-emission dairy development interventions need to support resilience at farm level and across the value chain. The COVID-19 lockdown in Kenya led to increased prices of hay and concentrates, resulting in increased production costs for farmers.

About 2 million rural households in Kenya produce milk. With about 1800 liters per cow and year, average annual milk production per cow on smallholder dairy farms is low. As a result, production costs per kilogram of milk are high, and profit margins for many farmers are slim.

This report documents the activities carried out under the CIP-CCAFS study on identifying opportunities and challenges for creating a climate-smart food system in the Philippines and Vietnam.

Although agriculture accounts for only 8.2% of the Republic of Zambia’s gross domestic product (GDP), almost half of the country’s economically active population works in the sector. Climate change poses a grave risk to the growth and sustainability of Zambian agricul ture.

In the United Republic of Tanzania, CSA has rapidly become a key mechanism for addressing both climate change and food security. Since 2011 more than nine CSA-related policies, programmes and projects have been implemented by the government and development partners. Outcomes from CSA projects, however, have not yet been tracked or reported on.

Agriculture is critical to Malawi’s future. It accounts for 80% of employment, more than 80% of foreign exchange earnings, and 64% of total income among the rural population. Due to the importance of agriculture to livelihoods and the economy, Malawi is among the countries most at risk from climate change and variability.

The Republic of Zimbabwe recognizes the need to take action to harmonize agricultural development with environmental protection and to reduce vulnerability to climate change. At least 22 unique projects and policies relevant to CSA were underway in 2014, and more have started since then.

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