With the current trend of land use/land cover (LULC) change taking place globally, several parts of northeast India are also showing signs of change in LULC pattern leading to forest loss. This study focusses on the expansion of monoculture rubber plantation (Hevea brasiliensis) in selected sub-watersheds in northeast India, and distributed in parts of north Tripura, Mizoram and a major portion in the Karimganj district of Assam.

Original Source

This paper reveals the magnitude of heavy metal contamination of soil and groundwater in and around an unauthorized e-waste recycling site in Delhi. Though unsafe and unorganized and with the e-waste handling now legally banned in Delhi, the informal sector is still actively involved in dismantling, extracting and disposing of e-waste in certain places on a considerably large scale.

Original Source

The rainfall pattern in North East (NE) India shows a large variation both spatially and temporally5 . Due to this, severe flood occurs frequently in the region. Therefore, it is important to study the variability of pre-monsoon and summer monsoon showers of the region in the geological past. The quantitative palaeomonsoonal record from NE India is poor.

Original Source

Trees impacted by the forces of natural processes such as flash floods, snow avalanches, landslides, rockfalls or earthquakes, record these events and exhibit growth disturbances in their growth-ring series. As a consequence, these disturbances provide an excellent signal for the spatio-temporal reconstruction of past natural hazard activity and a means to date and document past disasters.

Original Source

As an agro-food industry, sugar industry contributes to about 12% of the world’s sugar production with annual production capacity of 23 million tonnes. The sugar industry is a major water user and wastewater producer. According to Gunjal and Gunjal14, there are around 530 sugar industries in India having crushing capacity of 1.6 million tonnes per day utilizing 3.2 million m 3 of water, generating 0.6 million m 3 of effluent per day.

Original Source

Vulnerability of agriculture to climate change is becoming increasingly apparent in recent years. During 2014 and 2015, India experienced trails of unusually widespread and untimely hailstorm events. The increased frequency of hailstorm events, especially in vulnerable ecosystem of Deccan Plateau region of India demanded appropriate measures to minimize adverse impact on agricultural crops.

Original Source

Approaches used to early and accurately characterize epidemiologic patterns of disease incidence in a temporal and spatial series are becoming increasingly important. Cluster tests are generally designed for retrospective detection of epidemiologic anomalies in a temporal or space-time series. Timely identification of anomalies of disease or poisoning incidence during ongoing surveillance or an outbreak requires the use of sensitive statistical methods that recognize an incidence pattern at the time of occurrence.

The presence of diarrhoeagenic bacteria such as Escherichia coli in drinking water indicates faecal and sewage contamination. Testing the microbial quality of drinking water at source (n = 29) and households (n = 43) of 29 peri-urban villages of Bengaluru city, indicated that 80% and 93% of samples respectively were unfit for human consumption as per WHO standards, i.e. nil E. coli in 100 ml sample. This also indicated that water gets contaminated further at the point-of-use when compared to the source.

Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a matter of great concern in drug research. This study focuses on drugs which have been banned or withdrawn, due to serious problem of adverse reactions. Our attempt is to develop insights through plotting of data on cumulative counts of ADR reports. These data have been sourced from www.vigiaccess.org. Our expectation is that once a drug is banned/withdrawn, its count of ADR reports should fall precipitously and remain there. Instead a variety of shapes is encountered.

We describe the diversified National Ambient Noise Monitoring Network (NANMN) set up across 7 major cities of India and covering 70 stations for continuous noise monitoring throughout the year. The annual average Lday (06–22 h) and Lnight (22–06 h) values observed in 2015 for these 70 locations are described. Of these, 25 locations are in commercial zones, 12 in industrial, 16 in residential and 17 in silence zones. Each city has 10 noise monitoring stations installed for analysing environmental noise pollution levels round the clock (24  365 h).

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