This brief examines access to clean cooking energy, specifically across urban slum households in six Indian states - Bihar, Jharkhand, Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, and Chhattisgarh. Urban slums suffer from the double burden of pollution.

Some 4 billion people still cook with traditional polluting fuels and technologies. The adverse development impacts from households continued use of polluting stove-and-fuel combinations are significant.

In the context of SDG 7 on achieving universal access to affordable, reliable and modern energy services, the objective of this systematic review is to assess whether clean cooking interventions to date have been successful in increasing users’ adoption of clean cooking fuels and technologies (CFTs) and improving a subset of long-term health imp

This publication analyzes the use of clean and efficient cooking technologies in the Philippines and identifies opportunities and challenges to fast-track their uptake. In Asia and the Pacific, 1.8 billion people still rely on traditional cooking methods using fires and solid fuels.

Indoor air pollution in Indian households due to traditional biomass burning is a significant health burden. Clean fuels, such as liquified petroleum gas (LPG), offer sustainable alternatives. Over the years, the LPG adoption rate in India has increased; however, it is not enough to meet the UN Sustainable Development Goals by 2030.

The work summarized in this report fills a knowledge gap by contributing to an improved understanding of the links between competitiveness and pollution. Specifically, it argues that pollution need not be an inevitable consequence of development.

The study aimed to estimate the potential impacts of this planned LPG expansion (the Master Plan) on population health and climate change mitigation, assuming primary, sustained use of LPG for daily cooking.

Original Source

The Clean Cooking Energy Roadmap—developed in collaboration with NITI Aayog and GIZ— envisions to eliminate the use of all cooking arrangements that cause household air pollution (HAP) in India by 2025. It adopts a multi-fuel, multi-stakeholder approach, and is guided by principles of equity and inclusion.

Air pollution causes severe environmental problems and has become a major health risk for livelihood in Delhi. With increase in population, there is an increase in emissions from various utilities as well. The main source of air pollution is crop residue burning followed by vehicular and industrial emission.

Stationary air conditioning systems are used to provide cooling for indoor occupants for their thermal comfort at a suitable indoor air quality. Within the cooling sector the stationary air conditioning sub-sector represents the largest and most rapidly growing area of HFC use.

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