Nearly all the African continent faces severe health impacts caused by air pollution, with several countries experiencing some of the highest levels of air pollution in the world, according to this new HEI report.

India is home to 18 of the 20 cities with the most severe increase in fine particle pollutants or PM2.5 from 2010 to 2019, according to this comprehensive and detailed analysis of air pollution and global health effects for over 7,000 cities, published by the Health Effects Institute (HEI).

A comprehensive new scientific review released by the Health Effects Institute (HEI) finds growing confidence in the links between several adverse health effects and traffic-related air pollution (TRAP).

Exposure to air pollution has long been associated with mortality and shortened life expectancy and has been acknowledged as one of the main risk factors that affect people’s health worldwide. Among all air pollutants, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has been identified as a substantial public health concern.

This report presents a study led by Dr. Jane Clougherty at Dornsife School of Public Health, Drexel University. Clougherty and colleagues examined whether associations between community- and individual-level cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and ambient air pollutants vary by social stressors.

India has been recording an increase in PM 2.5 pollution since 2010 according to the State of Global Air 2020, released on 21 Oct 2020 Out of the 20 most populous countries, 14 have recorded a gradual improvement in air quality but India, Bangladesh, Niger, Pakistan and Japan are among those that have recorded a modest increase in air pollution levels.

The report provides a comprehensive and detailed analysis of emissions from shipping and related activities and their impacts on air quality and the health of the populations of the Yangtze River Delta and the city of Shanghai, both in a baseline year (2015, before implementation of China’s domestic emissions control areas) and under three futur

A new report released by the Health Effects Institute synthesizing nine research and policy studies conducted in Ghana finds that household air pollution is a significant contributor to fine particle outdoor air pollution in Ghana.

Over 1.2 million Indians died early due to exposure to unsafe air in 2017 reveals the State of Global Air 2019 released by the Health Effects Institute.  Air pollution is now the third-highest cause of death among all health risks, ranking just above smoking, in India.  

Health Effects Institute has published Household Air Pollution and Noncommunicable Disease, which provides a critical assessment of the state of the science examining the linkages between household air pollution formed by the burning of solid fuels and noncommunicable diseases.

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