A new report released by the Health Effects Institute synthesizing nine research and policy studies conducted in Ghana finds that household air pollution is a significant contributor to fine particle outdoor air pollution in Ghana.

Over 1.2 million Indians died early due to exposure to unsafe air in 2017 reveals the State of Global Air 2019 released by the Health Effects Institute.  Air pollution is now the third-highest cause of death among all health risks, ranking just above smoking, in India.  

Health Effects Institute has published Household Air Pollution and Noncommunicable Disease, which provides a critical assessment of the state of the science examining the linkages between household air pollution formed by the burning of solid fuels and noncommunicable diseases.

More than 95% of the world’s population breathe unsafe air and the burden is falling hardest on the poorest communities, with the gap between the most polluted and least polluted countries rising rapidly finds this comprehensive study on global air pollution by the Health Effects Institute

With rapid urbanization, high-density, high-rise megacities have become very common globally. So far, models to estimate exposure to air pollution have been largely two-dimensional.

The report Burden of Disease Attributable to Major Air Pollution Sources in India, provides the first comprehensive analysis of the levels of fine particulate matter air pollution (PM2.5) in India by source at the state level and their impact on health.

Air pollution is the leading environmental cause of death worldwide according to the State of Global Air 2017, a new, first annual report and interactive website launched at www.stateofglobalair.org. The report also finds that 92% of the world’s population lives in areas with unhealthy air.

The research report describes a study by Frank Gilliland and colleagues that was funded under HEI’s Accountability research program. The investigators collected air quality data and lung function and respiratory symptoms in three cohorts of children who participated in the Children’s Health Study in Southern California.

Burden of Disease Attributable to Coal-Burning and Other Major Sources of Air Pollution in China, provides the first comprehensive assessment of the current and predicted burdens of disease attributable to coal-burning and other major sources of particulate matter air pollution (PM2.5) in China at the national and provincial levels.

This new analysis identifies especially high risk levels in India and the developing countries of Asia where air pollution levels are the highest in the world.

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