A patchwork of emissions trading systems (ETSs) currently operate in several jurisdictions, including the EU, Switzerland, South Korea and several US states and Canadian provinces.

This paper investigates the role of ‘social spillovers’ – people learning from and imitating the behaviour of other people – in the adoption of new technologies, with a focus on liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) in India.

Does unilateral climate change policy cause companies to shift the location of production, thereby creating carbon leakage? In this paper, the authors analyse the effect of the European Union Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) on the geographical distribution of carbon emissions of multinational companies.

In this paper, the authors develop a model to assess the market stability reserve, a key feature of reforming the European Union’s emissions trading system (EU ETS). Reforms to the EU ETS have been made in the face of a significant, prolonged downturn in the allowance price.

China’s 11th Five-Year Plan set a goal to reduce the emission of sulphur dioxide (SO2) by 10% between 2006 and 2010. Stoerk provides the first empirical evaluation of this target.

This policy brief is based on previous research led by Professor Declan Conway at the London School of Economics and Political Science, in collaboration with researchers at University College London, the University of Pretoria and the University of East Anglia.

Developing country governments, supported by development partners, have a key role to play in enabling sustainable and inclusive private adaptation in semi-arid lands and in unlocking the potential of the private sector for adaptation.

This paper, reviews the current availability of climate information in Southern Africa and assesses the requirements of a variety of end users in the region, using empirical findings from an innovative regional survey.

Past cap-and-trade programmes have tended to encourage polluters to adopt existing abatement technologies, but have generally had little effect on innovation. This paper presents new evidence that the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) may have bucked this trend and encouraged innovation rather than adoption.

Past cap-and-trade programmes have tended to encourage polluters to adopt existing abatement technologies, but have generally had little effect on innovation. This paper presents new evidence that the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) may have bucked this trend and encouraged innovation rather than adoption.

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