As the climate is changing, the global economy is adapting. This paper provides a novel method of estimating how much adaptation has taken place historically, how much it has cost, and how much it has reduced the impacts of climate change.

Humanity is at a crossroads - a moment of great risk and great opportunity. One path leads to attractive growth and development; the other to great difficulties and destruction.

Climate change litigation continues to grow in importance year-on-year as a way of either advancing or delaying effective action on climate change. In 2022, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) recognised the role of litigation in affecting “the outcome and ambition of climate governance”.

This paper uses the housing market to examine the costs of indoor air pollution. The authors focus on radon, a common indoor air pollutant that is the leading cause of lung cancer after smoking.

For decades, the object of international climate governance has been greenhouse gases, standardised to tonnes of carbon dioxide-equivalent. The ongoing inadequacy of decarbonisation efforts based on this system has prompted calls to expand the scope of international climate governance to include restrictions on the supply of fossil fuels.

There is considerable anxiety about the international impact of unilateral action on climate change. Environmentalists are concerned that it leads to ‘carbon leakage’, that is, the migration of high-emissions activities from relatively tight regulatory environments to more lenient jurisdictions.

Cities are emerging as leading forces for climate change adaptation and resilience, due to their financial, technological and human capacities. Many approaches and tools have been developed and used over the last few decades to measure climate resilience in cities and identify areas that need further intervention.

The India Just Transition Finance Roadmap (JTFR) project is part of an international collaboration with international partners including CDC Group, Harvard Kennedy School, and the London School of Economics.

The low-carbon transformation of China’s urban areas is a crucial action towards meeting the Paris Agreement’s temperature goal. In this policy insight, Jasmine Tillu presents the economic case for this transformation. There is a strong economic case for transforming the development trajectory of China’s cities.

For China to meet its climate goals under the Paris Agreement and its 2060 carbon neutrality target, it is estimated that the country needs to spend US$20 trillion over the next three decades across all sectors.

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