Key messages Multi-lateral development banks (MDBs) have committed to financing climate change mitigation in agriculture and have adopted a harmonized methodology for attributing and reporting climate finance; however, design (including practice selection) and measurement of project impacts remains ad hoc.

This working paper assesses how Multilateral Development Banks can support the global temperature goal of the Paris Agreement. It illustrates how the banks could strengthen existing tools to align their portfolios and activities with the globally agreed mitigation goal.

Over half of the world’s least developed and lowest income countries are currently exploring for oil and gas or hoping to expand existing production.

Climate financing by the world’s six largest multilateral development banks (MDBs) rose to a seven-year high of $35.2 billion in 2017, up 28 per cent on the previous year.

A report by E3G assessing progress of six Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs) in aligning their financial flows with the Paris Agreement on climate change.

The world’s six largest multilateral development banks (MDBs) continued to make a strong contribution to the global climate challenge in 2016, increasing their climate financing in developing countries and emerging economies last year to $27.4 billion from $25 billion in 2015.

This guidance note aims to assist countries with determining how to secure the financing for their National Adaptation Plan (NAP) processes. Financing is needed throughout the entire NAP process to enable its potential to be reached—from its initiation to the implementation, monitoring and evaluation of prioritized adaptation actions.

Renewable energy will form a core thrust of India’s INDCs, and also of the India specific country strategies of the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank.

The best available science shows an urgent need to keep global temperature increases below 1.5°C to avoid severe disruptions to people and ecosystems. Recent analysis shows that burning the reserves in already operating oil and gas fields alone, even if coal mining is completely phased out, would take the world beyond 1.5°C of warming.

The Stop Coal Financing Report calls on the Asian Development Bank to cease all support for new coal projects, and to hasten the transition to sustainable renewable energy across Asia. Climate change poses extreme risks to the Asia Pacific region that will endanger the lives and livelihoods of low income people and people living in poverty.

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