Climate financing by the world’s largest multilateral development banks (MDBs) in developing countries and emerging economies rose to an all-time high of $43.1 billion in 2018, boosting projects that help developing countries cut emissions and address climate risks.

Several multilateral development banks use shadow carbon pricing to help decide which transactions to make. This briefing considers some best practices and limitations in the application of shadow carbon prices.

New research from the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA) reveals that over 100 major global financial institutions have introduced policies restricting coal funding.

This report is a synthesis of evidence gathered on transformational change within the Climate Investment Funds (CIF). It complements a parallel evaluation on transformational change in the countries where CIF operates. It is distinguished from the evaluation by a focus on the secondary literature, produced both within and outside CIF.

To contribute to the fight against climate change, the MDBs have to date largely operated under what we refer to as a Climate Finance Paradigm. That paradigm involves defining, tracking, and maximizing the amount of climate finance that MDBs provide and mobilize.

Key messages Multi-lateral development banks (MDBs) have committed to financing climate change mitigation in agriculture and have adopted a harmonized methodology for attributing and reporting climate finance; however, design (including practice selection) and measurement of project impacts remains ad hoc.

This working paper assesses how Multilateral Development Banks can support the global temperature goal of the Paris Agreement. It illustrates how the banks could strengthen existing tools to align their portfolios and activities with the globally agreed mitigation goal.

Over half of the world’s least developed and lowest income countries are currently exploring for oil and gas or hoping to expand existing production.

Climate financing by the world’s six largest multilateral development banks (MDBs) rose to a seven-year high of $35.2 billion in 2017, up 28 per cent on the previous year.

A report by E3G assessing progress of six Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs) in aligning their financial flows with the Paris Agreement on climate change.

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