Using data from the nationally representative India Residential Energy Consumption Survey (IRES) 2020, this study reflects on the current state of clean cooking energy access in India, the progress made over the past decade, persisting gaps, and emerging trends.

The transition to sustainable energy requires an assessment of drivers of the use of clean and dirty fuels for cooking. Literature highlights the importance of access to modern fuel for switching from dirty fuels.

This brief examines access to clean cooking energy, specifically across urban slum households in six Indian states - Bihar, Jharkhand, Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, and Chhattisgarh. Urban slums suffer from the double burden of pollution.

Some 4 billion people still cook with traditional polluting fuels and technologies. The adverse development impacts from households continued use of polluting stove-and-fuel combinations are significant.

In the context of SDG 7 on achieving universal access to affordable, reliable and modern energy services, the objective of this systematic review is to assess whether clean cooking interventions to date have been successful in increasing users’ adoption of clean cooking fuels and technologies (CFTs) and improving a subset of long-term health imp

This study’s primary aim is to explore ways to reduce heating-related residential sector emissions using a scenario analysis approach as the basis of a roadmap for Kazakhstan. The purpose of this roadmap is to help Kazakhstan formulate a policy framework and conditions to enable a household energy-use transition.

The Energizing Finance: Understanding the Landscape report, developed by Sustainable Energy for All in partnership with Climate Policy Initiative and produced annually since 2017, provides a comprehensive analysis of commitments flowing to the two key areas of energy access: electrification and clean cooking.

Indoor air pollution in Indian households due to traditional biomass burning is a significant health burden. Clean fuels, such as liquified petroleum gas (LPG), offer sustainable alternatives. Over the years, the LPG adoption rate in India has increased; however, it is not enough to meet the UN Sustainable Development Goals by 2030.

The study aimed to estimate the potential impacts of this planned LPG expansion (the Master Plan) on population health and climate change mitigation, assuming primary, sustained use of LPG for daily cooking.

Original Source

A new UN Environment Programme (UNEP) desk study launched at the 17th African Ministerial Conference on the Environment in Durban, South Africa, calls for urgent action to address the production and consumption of biomass as a source of energy in Africa.

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