The national government wants counties to allocate at least Sh100 million ($969,929) annually for renewable energy projects in their County Integrated Development Plans in order to reduce indoor ai

For households without access to grid-based electricity or gas for cooking, traditional cook stoves are typically fuelled by wood or charcoal, generating considerable indoor air pollution. Cook stoves fuelled with biogas provide complete combustion, significantly alleviating health and environmental problems.

Air pollution exposure is the second most important risk factor for ill health in South Asia, contributing to between 13% and 21.7% of all deaths and approximately 58 million disability adjusted life years (DALYs) through chronic and acute respiratory and cardiovascular illnesses.1 Of the top 30 cities in the world with the poorest air quality in 2016, 17 are in South Asia.2 The impact of air pollution transcends boundaries. The “brown cloud”—caused by pollution from carbon aerosols—is a phenomenon captured in satellite images of atmospheric haze over South Asia, as well as China.

The 2015 smoke haze episode was one of the most severe and prolonged transboundary air pollution events ever seen in Southeast Asia (SEA), affecting the air quality of several countries within the region including Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore. The 24 h mean outdoor PM2.5 (particulate matter (PM) with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm) concentrations ranged from 72–157 μg m−3 in Singapore during this episode, exceeding the WHO 24 h mean PM2.5 guidelines (25 μg m−3) several times over.

As pollution levels deteriorate in the National Capital Region, health experts have warned that continuous exposure to polluted air has the potential to cause a stroke among adults.

Indoor air pollution is second only to outdoor air pollution when it comes to deaths caused globally, a recent survey found.

An estimated 4.5 billion people are currently exposed to particulate matter (PM) levels at least twice the concentration that the WHO considers safe. Existing evidence linking health to air pollution is largely based on populations exposed to only modest levels of PM and almost entirely composed of observational studies, which are likely to confound air pollution with other unobserved determinants of health.

It could well be that you are breathing in air in your home that is of poorer quality than the air outside.

A new World Health Organization (WHO) report highlights the links between air pollution and the epidemic of non-communicable diseases (also called NCDs) that is affecting people worldwide.

According to latest figures from the World Health Organisation (WHO), 4.3 million people a year die prematurely from illness attributable to the household air pollution caused by the inefficient us

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