Prioritizing and targeting less developed regions is one of the multi-pronged strategies for doubling farmers’ income (DFI) in India.

By reviving millet farming systems, the tribal households in Odisha have reduced their vulnerability to climate change. The millet based farming has also helped in addressing the problem of malnutrition in the communities.

Knowledge is the basis for sustainable development, but successful implementation depends on understanding what works in the field and where to improve lives and the environment.

Paying farmers for ecosystem services that they provide could be a novel way to achieve multiple goals of doubling the farm incomes, reduce rural–urban migration, reduce pressure on urban infrastructure, and at the same time, incentivise sustainable agrarian practices in India.

This working paper was based on the study on multiple uses of small reservoirs in the Volta River Basin of Burkina Faso. The study was conducted in communities using five small reservoirs in Yatenga Province.

This publication seeks to document the findings of a study on the general characteristics of agrodiversity, its significance, status, rate of change, and causal factors; the ecological, social, and policy dimensions of agrodiversity and their impact on the loss of agrobiodiversity; and existing strategies for the management of agroecosystems in

The agroecological initiatives show the great importance of integration of farming systems in their territory for developing a range of services. Agroecological systems develop diverse relationships with other actors of local communities; in first place other farmers for knowledge exchange and cooperation.

Tubers, pulses and millets are important for the livelihoods and nutrition of poor farmers, especially in fragile regions. These crops are not only underutilised, but are also underresearched. Ama Sangathan, a women federation consisting of 1200 indigenous women, have revived these crops in two blocks in Odisha, by their vibrant campaigning.

Original Source

Public agencies and private enterprises increasingly desire to achieve ecosystem service outcomes in agricultural systems, but are limited by perceived conflicts between economic and ecosystem service goals and a lack of tools enabling effective operational management. Here we use Iowa—an agriculturally homogeneous state representative of the Maize Belt—to demonstrate an economic rationale for cropland diversification at the subfield scale.

North East India (NEI) has 17.2 M ha under forest cover, which is ~25% of India’s total forest area. Of the total forest cover, 1.5 M ha is currently managed by shifting cultivation in NEI. Shifting cultivation, an integral part of culture and tradition of tribes of NEI, is presently unsustainable because of the populationdriven reduction in the duration of the fallow cycle (3–5 years).

Original Source

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