This report has been commissioned by the European Climate Foundation.

Translating the EU’s long-term strategy into action also means engaging more deeply with the different opportunities, challenges and conditions to unlock specific challenges faced by individual Member States or sub-national regions. A common European approach to decarbonisation and common legislative tools are of course needed.

Current emission reduction pledges under the 2015 Paris Agreement are insufficient to keep global temperature “well below +2°C” in 2100 relative to pre-industrial levels and to reach targets of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

Alarming signals about the need for a transition of the agricultural and food system in Europe have been accumulating for several years and social expectation for such a transition is growing. How can we feed Europe - and feed it well - while preserving nature and the climate?

This report explores pathways, implications and policy options of for a full phase out of South Africa’s aging coal power infrastructure during the next decades. It also highlights issues of employment, economic development and social cohesion linked to the future of South Africa’s coal production and export industry.

Under the Coal Transitions project, national experts in China, India, South Africa, Poland, Australia and Germany explored options for their countries to implement economically feasible and socially acceptable coal transition strategies that are consistent with the goals of the Paris Climate Agreement.

This report seeks to draw upon the composite lessons learned at domestic and subnational levels and aims to respond to three fundamental questions facing policymakers and stakeholders at national and subnational levels: Why do we need strong national climate governance frameworks and how do we get there?

After three unprecedented consecutive years of decline, early estimates have brought the bad news that China’s energy-related CO2 emissions appear to have risen in 2017. Very preliminary estimates for the months passed of 2018 suggest that this trend is continuing. Is it time to give up hope that CO2 emissions can be controlled?

This paper estimates the potential scale of stranded assets in the coal power sector in China under different policy scenarios.

This report is the first output of a major international research project coordinated by IDDRI and Climates Strategies, entitled “Coal Transitions: Research and Dialogue on the Future of Coal”, bringing together leading research institutes in several major coal producing and consuming countries.

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