The ‘Urban WASH' project was implemented in George and Chawama compounds in Lusaka between July 2013 and June 2017 by Oxfam and Village Water. The project aimed to improve provision and sustainable management of WASH services by engaging citizens to hold duty bearers and service providers to account.

This case study shows how clean, affordable and reliable electricity can be provided to thousands of people even in the poorest, most remote and difficult terrains.

The world’s ten richest men have seen their combined wealth increase by $540 billion (£400 billion) during the pandemic, while the crisis threatens a lost decade in the fight against poverty, Oxfam revealed today in a report published on the opening day of the World Economic Forum’s Davos Agenda.

This is the inspiring story of the Farmer-to-Farmer Agroecology Movement (MACAC) in Cuba. The movement has spread across Cuba and inspired over 200,000 farmers to take up agro-ecological farming practices. The story shows that it possible for a social movement to take sustainable agroecological farming systems to scale.

Beyond the Grid Fund for Zambia is notable for the scale and speed with which it has provided clean solar electricity.

New Oxfam analysis reveals huge carbon inequality in Europe: EU emissions cuts since 1990 have been achieved only among lower and middle income EU citizens, while the total emissions of the richest 10% actually grew.

Indian laws – the Forest Conservation Act, 1980 along with the Forest Rights Act (FRA), 2006 and the Right to Fair Compensation and Transparency in Land Acquisition, Rehabilitation and Resettlement Act (LARR), 2013 – make it mandatory for government bodies and the promoters of projects to obtain the consent of Indigenous people and other communi

Across large areas of the Sahel region of West Africa, one of the poorest and most environmentally precarious areas of Africa, a decades-long revolution in agroecology has produced remarkable results in improving food security and reversing environmental degradation.

The true value of money provided by developed countries to help developing nations respond to the climate crisis may be just a third of the amount reported, according to Oxfam estimates published.

The coronavirus pandemic has swept across a world unprepared to fight it, because countries had failed to choose policies to fight inequality.

Pages