Cyclone Idai struck Zimbabwe in March 2019, affecting 270,000 people. The storm and subsequent flooding and landslides left 340 people dead and many others missing. Agriculture, schools and infrastructure all suffered heavy impacts; many people lost their homes. Chimanimani and Chipinge Districts were hardest hit.

The Gaza Strip is a densely populated area with limited water and power resources. The groundwater aquifer is the only available source, with a deficit of 145 million cubic metres per year between demand and supply. Consequently, the quality of the aquifer has deteriorated and water desalination plants are being constructed.

More than 15 million people are in need of aid as drought hits parts of Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia again. Yet lessons from the devastating droughts of 2011 and 2017 are being ignored, putting lives at risk, warned Oxfam.

In Nepal, only 25% of water supply schemes are functioning well. While there are several approaches to setting up schemes, there is only one model of ongoing service management – community-based management through local water user committees.

The food price crisis of 2007–08 had devastating impacts for the world’s poorest people, especially for smallholder farmers and in particular for women, who face discrimination and a heavy burden of household responsibility.

Oxfam’s new report “Ten Years after the Global Food Crisis, Rural Women Still Bear the Brunt of Poverty and Hunger” analyses the reforms implemented since the food price crisis in 2007-2008, and highlights why they will not be enough to prevent another crisis or end hunger.

Universal health, education and other public services reduce the gap between rich and poor, and between women and men. Fairer taxation of the wealthiest can help pay for them. Our economy is broken, with hundreds of millions of people living in extreme poverty while huge rewards go to those at the very top.

There have been many development advances in recent decades. But our world is also undergoing major transformations and facing profound development challenges. These include extreme inequality, climate breakdown, gender injustice and the curtailment of civic freedoms.

In 2015, the leaders of 193 governments promised to reduce inequality under Goal 10 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Without reducing inequality, meeting SDG 1 to eliminate poverty will be impossible.

Three years after the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), reliable information on how companies are working to contribute to the SDGs remains sparse.

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