Forests provide, directly or indirectly, important health benefits for all people – not only those whose lives are closely intertwined with forest ecosystems, but also people far from forests, including urban populations.

COVID-19 is a global health crisis that has caused a shock to food and agricultural systems around the world, affecting production, supply chains, trade, markets, and people’s livelihoods and nutrition.

The GRFC 2020 reported the highest global number of acutely food-insecure people on record. It revealed that in 2019, some 135 million in 55 countries and territories were in need of urgent food, livelihood and nutrition assistance as a result of conflict, weather extremes, economic shocks, or a combination of all three drivers.

The dietary guidelines emphasize promotion of health and prevention of disease, of all age groups with special focus on vulnerable segments of the population such as infants, children and adolescents, pregnant and lactating women and the elderly.

The report presents, for the first time, the contribution of various food groups to the total energy, proteins, fats and carbohydrates from the dietary data of two large-scale surveys in India that used 24-hour recall method.

Over the past months, as the world has sought desperately to deal both with the medical impacts of the virus and to prepare a response to its many secondary effects, research on COVID-19 has accelerated.

New analysis reveals the number of children living in multidimensional poverty – without access to education, health, housing, nutrition, sanitation, or water – has increased by 15 per cent since the start of the pandemic.

The COVID-19 pandemic threatens to disrupt the livelihoods of thousands of vulnerable families in Zambia. This has the potential to reinforce poverty and deepen food and nutrition insecurity. Furthermore, economic disruptions that have slowed down investments, resulted in high unemployment and declined remittances.

This paper examines the main risks faced by the migrant children in Trinidad and Tobago and the exacerbating impact of COVID-19 outbreak due to: i) disruption to education, ii) rising unemployment, iii) risks to mental health and safety, and iv) to child nutrition and health.

This report is the combined effort of four UN agencies (FAO, WFP, WHO, UNICEF) and the Government of Pakistan coming together to present the overall picture of where Pakistan stands in the efforts to eliminate hunger and malnutrition.

Pages