Investing in human capital—the sum of a population’s health, skills, knowledge, and experience—can strengthen a country’s competitiveness in a rapidly changing world. Building human capital prepares work forces for the more highly skilled jobs of the future, which can drive more sustained growth and transform the trajectory of economies.

Governments and partners across the Middle East and North Africa Region (MENA) are acting to protect citizens from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). These crucial efforts will save many lives. However, measures needed to slow the transmission of the disease are resulting in hardship for many vulnerable families.

WFP's Fill the Nutrient Gap tool analyses the nutrition situation in a country and identifies the barriers faced by the most vulnerable to accessing and consuming healthy and nutritious foods.

Increased reprioritisation of national expenditure towards control of COVID19 will affect allocations to other sectors such as agriculture which would have long-term effects on food production and supply. The economic fallout for the continent has the potential to be severe and long-lasting.

The WFP Centre of Excellence against Hunger is a global hub for knowledge exchange, capacity development and technical assistance to assist countries achieve zero hunger while it supports national ownership of programmes that guarantee sustainability of actions.

Micronutrient deficiency continues to affect sizeable sections of the global population in India and this “hidden hunger” extracts a substantial toll in terms of morbidity, mortality, reduced economic productivity and poor quality of life from those who are affected.

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the weakness of food and health systems, disproportionately impacting already vulnerable populations.

HarvestPlus is committed to making food systems healthier and more inclusive to benefit the world’s most vulnerable people—particularly smallholder farming families in low- and middle-income countries.

The plight of indigenous peoples has drawn increased attention in recent years as they strive to retain their cultures and protect their ecosystems, lands and food traditions in the face of globalisation.

As the COVID-19 pandemic has spread to virtually every corner of the world, lockdowns, supply disruptions, and economic pain have followed in its wake, raising alarm about food and nutrition security among policy makers, the development community, and other observers.

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