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A New World Bank report examines how marine pollution in the Caribbean threatens the region’s resilience to climate change.

The Katowice Climate Conference has come and gone, and a busy 2019 calendar headlined by the UN Secretary-General’s September climate summit is already in full swing. It’s important to not only look back at the developments of 2018 with a focus on the package of outcomes from COP24 but also look forward to the key moments of 2019.

The High Level Political Forum (HLPF) was established by the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development and is the place where countries present their Voluntary National Reviews (VNR), which result from their review processes of the implementation of the 2030 Agenda at the national level, to the international community.

The ten successful case studies show how the CSA approach has been applied in the regional context to benefit both the agricultural sectors and farming communities.

This report gives an assessment of progress towards each of the Convention on Biological Diversity’s 20 Aichi Biodiversity Targets, as a basis for the development of common strategies building on each member’s priorities and needs.

A third of all waste generated in cities of Latin America and the Caribbean ends up in open dumps or in the environment, polluting soil, water and air, and threatening the health of the population, according to a UN Environment report.

With more than 70 percent of its population living in cities, Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) is among the most urbanized regions in the world. Yet, although its cities are, on average, more productive than those elsewhere in the world, their productivity lags that of North American and Western European cities.

This technical report, Progress and Opportunities of Reducing Short-lived Climate Pollutants across Latin America and the Caribbean, reviews examples of initiatives and measures that have successfully reduced emissions of black carbon, methane and some hydrofluorocarbons in Latin America and the Caribbean, the three short-lived climate pollutant

Efforts to reduce dangerous air and climate pollutants by Latin American and Caribbean countries could reap immediate and long-term benefits for health, food security and the climate according to the first ever Integrated Assessment of Short-lived Climate Pollutants (SLCPs) for the region.

The UN Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) released an updated version of its statistical yearbook, which provides information on economic, environmental and socio-demographic indicators. Gender-related findings include that women hold 28.7% of the seats in national parliaments.

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