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A third of all waste generated in cities of Latin America and the Caribbean ends up in open dumps or in the environment, polluting soil, water and air, and threatening the health of the population, according to a UN Environment report.

With more than 70 percent of its population living in cities, Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) is among the most urbanized regions in the world. Yet, although its cities are, on average, more productive than those elsewhere in the world, their productivity lags that of North American and Western European cities.

This technical report, Progress and Opportunities of Reducing Short-lived Climate Pollutants across Latin America and the Caribbean, reviews examples of initiatives and measures that have successfully reduced emissions of black carbon, methane and some hydrofluorocarbons in Latin America and the Caribbean, the three short-lived climate pollutant

Efforts to reduce dangerous air and climate pollutants by Latin American and Caribbean countries could reap immediate and long-term benefits for health, food security and the climate according to the first ever Integrated Assessment of Short-lived Climate Pollutants (SLCPs) for the region.

The UN Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) released an updated version of its statistical yearbook, which provides information on economic, environmental and socio-demographic indicators. Gender-related findings include that women hold 28.7% of the seats in national parliaments.

An action plan for implementing the New Urban Agenda (NUA) in Latin America and the Caribbean envisions the city as a “macro-level public good” where citizens’ economic, social, cultural and environmental rights are guaranteed.

The total number of persons that suffer from hunger in Latin America and the Caribbean has increased, reversing decades of progress, even as overweight and obesity emerged as a major problem in all countries in the region of the Americas, according to the Panorama of Food Security and Nutrition in Latin America and the Caribbean 2017, published

The Caribbean region’s Small Island Developing States (SIDS) face considerable threats from climate change, and considerable costs to cope with and adapt to climate impacts that exceed their financial capacity.

Incorporating climate risk management into infrastructure planning and design is critical to building societal resilience and protecting economic growth.

CDKN’s flagship book, Mainstreaming Climate Compatible Development, draws from the alliance’s seven year experience of supporting climate compatible development in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean.

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